Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

First of all, sorry for this simple question. But I need to understand what is happening.

I thought the output should be upper case string. But it comes out to be UPPER CASE STRING.

- (void)test
{
     NSString *stringVar = @"UPPER CASE STRING";
     [self changeString:stringVar];
     NSLog(@"value after changed : %@", stringVar);
}

- (void)changeString:(NSString*)string
{
     string = [string lowercaseString];
}

What is happening and how to fix it?

share|improve this question
up vote 34 down vote accepted

The [string lowercaseString] call creates a new NSString object that you assign to the local variable string. This does not change the value of stringVar outside the changeString function. The pointer itself is passed by value.

One way to do what you want, is to pass a pointer to a pointer:

-(void) test
{
     NSString *stringVar = @"UPPER CASE STRING";
     [self changeString:&stringVar];
     NSLog(@"value after changed : %@", stringVar);
}

-(void) changeString:(NSString**)string
{
     *string = [*string lowercaseString];
}
share|improve this answer
    
Just to make sure, ARC would handle the memory handling even in this case transparently, right? – Joachim Isaksson Jul 31 '12 at 10:11
    
Dear Greg, This means Objective C by default uses pass by value mechanism right? – Charith Nidarsha Jul 31 '12 at 10:16
    
@JoachimIsaksson: Yes, ARC handles the memory management correctly (the compiler will warn you if it can't figure out what you are doing). – Greg Hewgill Jul 31 '12 at 20:03
3  
@charith: Yes, the semantics for argument passing in Objective-C are the same as in C. – Greg Hewgill Jul 31 '12 at 20:03

If you look at the reference to the [NSString lowerCaseString] method, you can see that it returns a new string, with the lowercase'd characters:

Returns lowercased representation of the receiver.

- (NSString *)lowercaseString

What your code does is simply overwrite the reference to the input string with the output of the lowercaseString call, which has no effect. The best way to solve this issue is for you to return the value yourself, which makes the method easier to understand:

-(void) test
{
     NSString *stringVar = @"UPPER CASE STRING";
     stringVar = [self changeString:stringVar];
     NSLog(@"value after changed : %@", stringVar);
}

-(NSString *) changeString:(NSString*)string
{
     string = [string lowercaseString];
     return string;
}

You need to understand that NSString is immutable so there is no way, other than reassigning the reference, to change a string's contents. You could, however use NSMutableString instead, which can be modified in place.

share|improve this answer

string is a local variable (a pointer to an NSString which is immutable), you're just changing what stringpoints to in the local function, but when you return its value will be thrown away.

What you may want to do is to simply pass the string as a parameter and return the lower case string from the function.

share|improve this answer

string in -(void) changeString:(NSString*)string is local variable, modify method to return value:

-(void) test
{
     NSString *stringVar = @"UPPER CASE STRING";
     stringVar =[self changeString:stringVar];
     NSLog(@"value after changed : %@", stringVar);
}
-(NSString *) changeString:(NSString*)string
{
    return [string lowercaseString];
}
share|improve this answer
    
Assigning NSString to a Void method is an error and a Void method doesn't return a value – Sumanth Jul 31 '12 at 10:04
    
sorry, my bad, of cource return value is 'NSString*' – mas'an Jul 31 '12 at 10:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.