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How to programmatically grant AllPermissions to an RMI application without using policy file?

UPDATE:

After some researching, I have written this custom Policy Class and installed it via Policy.setPolicy(new MyPolicy()).

Now I get the following error:

invalid permission: (java.io.FilePermission \C:\eclipse\plugins\org.eclipse.osgi_3.7.0.v20110613.jar read

class MyPolicy extends Policy {

    @Override
    public PermissionCollection getPermissions(CodeSource codesource) {
        return (new AllPermission()).newPermissionCollection();
    }

}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Based on @EJP's advice, I have debugged using -Djava.security.debug=access and found all the needed permissions in a policy file :

grant { permission java.net.SocketPermission "*:1024-", "connect, resolve"; };

grant { permission java.util.PropertyPermission "*", "read, write"; };

grant { permission java.io.FilePermission "<>", "read"; };

But because I didn't want to create a policy file, I found a way to replicate this programmatically by extending java.security.Policy class and setting the policy at the startup of my application using Policy.setPolicy(new MinimalPolicy());

public class MinimalPolicy extends Policy {

    private static PermissionCollection perms;

    public MinimalPolicy() {
        super();
        if (perms == null) {
            perms = new MyPermissionCollection();
            addPermissions();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public PermissionCollection getPermissions(CodeSource codesource) {
        return perms;
    }

    private void addPermissions() {
        SocketPermission socketPermission = new SocketPermission("*:1024-", "connect, resolve");
        PropertyPermission propertyPermission = new PropertyPermission("*", "read, write");
        FilePermission filePermission = new FilePermission("<<ALL FILES>>", "read");

        perms.add(socketPermission);
        perms.add(propertyPermission);
        perms.add(filePermission);
    }

}

class MyPermissionCollection extends PermissionCollection {

    private static final long serialVersionUID = 614300921365729272L;

    ArrayList<Permission> perms = new ArrayList<Permission>();

    public void add(Permission p) {
        perms.add(p);
    }

    public boolean implies(Permission p) {
        for (Iterator<Permission> i = perms.iterator(); i.hasNext();) {
            if (((Permission) i.next()).implies(p)) {
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    }

    public Enumeration<Permission> elements() {
        return Collections.enumeration(perms);
    }

    public boolean isReadOnly() {
        return false;
    }

}
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Don't install the SecurityManager. You only need it if you're using the codebase feature, and if you need that you need a proper .policy file,

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I have to use the codebase feature. So I do need it. I was hoping to replace the policy file with something like a custom java.security.Policy which contains a AllPermissionCollection. Can it work this way? and what need to be overriden to make it work? –  Adel Boutros Jul 31 '12 at 13:10
    
Can you see my edit please? –  Adel Boutros Jul 31 '12 at 13:13
1  
@AdelBoutros If you're using the codebase feature you definitely don't want to grant AllPermission. You will be running code from anothe source. You need to construct a proper .policy file that grants exactly the permissions you think the downloaded code should need, and no others. You can establish that with a bit of helpmfr from -Djava.security.debug=access,failure. –  EJP Jul 31 '12 at 22:52
    
I already know how to create a policy file. That's not what I want because my application is an Eclipse plugin, thus you cannot add a policy file to a single eclipse-plugin, you need to add it to eclipse.ini which the clients will find hard to accept –  Adel Boutros Aug 1 '12 at 7:57
1  
@AdelBoutros You don't have the choice. There is no way to do what you want. In any case, I suggest that your clients would find it even harder to accept an RMI product that disables all the security features designed into RMI, if it was possible, which fortunately it isn't. What you should be doing is giving the client the opportunity to define the permissions, instead of trying to evade the issue and break the Java security model. –  EJP Aug 1 '12 at 8:52

Because your

new AllPermission()).newPermissionCollection()

is treated by Java as immutable (why add permissions to a collection that already allows all permissions?), and because Java will try to add permissions to the collection. That's where the error message comes from - Java tried to add a java.io.FilePermission to your AllPermission.

Instead, do this:

class MyPolicy extends Policy {
    @Override
    public PermissionCollection getPermissions(CodeSource codesource) {
        Permissions p = new Permissions();
        p.add(new PropertyPermission("java.class.path", "read"));
        p.add(new FilePermission("/home/.../classes/*", "read"));
        ... etc ...
        return p;
    }
}
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Actually your reasoning is kinda on the right track. But it's not entirely true: Checking the source code of AllPermissions, by default the (new AllPermission()).newPermissionCollection() returns a collection of permission which will always return false. This is until you add an instance of AllPermission to it. –  Adel Boutros Oct 22 '14 at 10:19
    
Here is the link for the source code: grepcode.com/file/repository.grepcode.com/java/root/jdk/openjdk/… –  Adel Boutros Oct 22 '14 at 10:20

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