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This is my problem:

I have a file-system like data-structure:

%fs = (
    "home" => {
        "test.file"  => { 
            type => "file",
            owner => 1000, 
            content => "Hello World!",
        },
    },
    "etc"  => { 
        "passwd"  => { 
            type => "file",
            owner => 0, 
            content => "testuser:testusershash",
            },
        "conf"  => { 
            "test.file"  => { 
                type => "file",
                owner => 1000, 
                content => "Hello World!",
            },
        },
    },
);

Now, to get the content of /etc/conf/test.file I need $fs{"etc"}{"conf"}{"test.file"}{"content"}, but my input is an array and looks like this: ("etc","conf","test.file").

So, because the length of the input is varied, I don't know how to access the values of the hash. Any ideas?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted
my @a = ("etc","conf","test.file");

my $h = \%fs;
while (my $v = shift @a) {
  $h = $h->{$v};
}
print $h->{type};
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You can use a loop. In each step, you proceed one level deeper into the structure.

my @path = qw/etc conf test.file/;
my %result = %fs;
while (@path) {
    %result = %{ $result{shift @path} };
}
print $result{content};

You can also use Data::Diver.

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Same logic as what others given, but uses foreach

@keys = qw(etc conf test.file content);
$r = \%fs ;
$r = $r->{$_} foreach (@keys);
print $r;
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$pname = '/etc/conf/test.file';
@names = split '/', $pname;
$fh = \%fs;
for (@names) {
    $fh = $fh->{"$_"} if $_;
}
print $fh->{'content'};
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Path::Class accepts an array. It also gives you an object with helper methods and handles cross platform slash issues.

https://metacpan.org/module/Path::Class

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You can just build the hash element expression and call eval. This is tidier if it is wrapped in a subroutine

my @path = qw/ etc conf test.file /;

print hash_at(\%fs, \@path)->{content}, "\n";

sub hash_at {
  my ($hash, $path) = @_;
  $path = sprintf q($hash->{'%s'}), join q('}{'), @$path;
  return eval $path;
}
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Can the down voters please explain? There is no problem with eval as long as the source of the string is reliable. Here we have built it ourselves so it is trustworthy. –  Borodin Jul 31 '12 at 12:37
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