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I have been trying to get my head around C#'s new async/await and Task.Run functionality recently. In doing so I wrote some simple test code that writes to the console so that I can see in what order things happen in, throwing in a Thread.Sleep here and there to make sure things really happens in the order I expected.

Here is one of my tests

[Test]
public void TaskRun()
{
    Console.WriteLine("Before");
    Task.Run(() => Console.WriteLine(_terminator.IWillBeBack()));
    Console.WriteLine("After");
}

with the following Terminator class:

public class Terminator
{
    public string IWillBeBack()
    {
        return "I will be back";
    }
}

From this I expected the result to most likely be Before, After, and then I will be back. This is indeed what happens. Then I make a change to the IWillBeBack-method to allow it to sleep for 3 seconds. The code for this:

public class Terminator
{
    public string IWillBeBack()
    {
        Thread.Sleep(3000);
        return "I will be back";
    }
}

I expected the result to still be Before, After, and then after 3 seconds again I will be back. This is not what happens though. I instead get Before and After, but never I will be back.

Why is this?

When I debug it clearly goes through the code, sleeping and returning. I don't need Thread.Sleep in this way in any production code, but I would like to have a vague understanding of why I will be back is not written to the console in the second case.

share|improve this question
    
I'm a bit lazy today so I will just reference the answer. I wrote something on this a few days back that could help in understanding TPL+async/await: blog.tedd.no/2012/07/28/asyncawait-http-server-in-c – Tedd Hansen Jul 31 '12 at 11:56
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your test is completing before it tries to print "I will be back". You're not doing anything to wait until that's finished. Depending on the test runner, however it's redirecting Console.WriteLine may have been disconnected as soon as the test has finished.

If you want to see it finish, change your test to:

[Test]
public void TaskRun()
{
    Console.WriteLine("Before");
    var task = Task.Run(() => Console.WriteLine(_terminator.IWillBeBack()));
    Console.WriteLine("After");
    task.Wait();
}
share|improve this answer
    
That makes sense. I ran your test and it works as expected now :) – Halvard Jul 31 '12 at 11:44
    
Am I just "lucky" that it writes "I will be back" in the first case then (as I don't do anything to wait there either)? In lucky I mean, it happens to be able to write in time to the Console before the test is completing. – Halvard Jul 31 '12 at 11:51
    
@Halvard: Yup. It's possible that test tear-down has some "slightly costly" work to do which is giving your other thread the edge. – Jon Skeet Jul 31 '12 at 11:53
2  
@Halvard: Please note that you should only use Wait in sample console applications. As a general rule, do not mix blocking and asynchronous code in production systems. You may want to read my async intro and followup post on async console programs. – Stephen Cleary Jul 31 '12 at 13:00

If you use the MS Test framework in VS 2012 you can also write the test like this

[TestMethod]
public async Task TaskRun()
{
    Console.WriteLine("Before");
    Task t = Task.Run(() => Console.WriteLine(IWillBeBack()));
    Console.WriteLine("After");
    await t;
}

private string IWillBeBack()
{
    Thread.Sleep(3000);
    return "I will be back";
}
share|improve this answer
    
I expected this to work when I saw your code, but when running your test I got Before and After, but not I will be back. As far as I have understood the difference between task.Wait() and await task is that the first blocks and the second does not. Could this be the reason yours does not work? (By the way, I see the output in the the default test GUI window for VS 2012 and use the NUnit framework. Could it be that I'm tricked by that?) – Halvard Jul 31 '12 at 12:31
    
AFAIK, NUnit does not support async unit tests. I believe only MSTest and xUnit do right now. – Stephen Cleary Jul 31 '12 at 12:57
1  
UPDATE: When the previous comment was written NUnit did not support async unit tests, but now it does. – Halvard Aug 21 '13 at 6:53

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