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why doesn't this work as expected. (see expected comment)

var Module = function () {
    var public_instance_var;

    function doStuff () {
        Module.doOtherStuff();
        console.log(public_instance_var); // expected: true, but logs undefined
    };

    function doOtherStuff() {
        public_instance_var = true;
    };

    return {
        public_instance_var: instance_var,
        doStuff: doStuff,
        doOtherStuff: doOtherStuff
    }
}();

Module.doStuff();

Update: Fixed accordingly to a few of jAndy suggestions

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seems like you missed instance_var –  Madman Jul 31 '12 at 11:42
    
Is there a typo in the return? where is instance_var defined? –  ThirdOne Jul 31 '12 at 11:42
2  
Module.doStuff(); should throw the error that Module does not have a callable property doStuff (or similar). The line with your comment is never executed. Also, this really does not have anything to do with OOP. –  Felix Kling Jul 31 '12 at 11:44
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3 Answers 3

Multiple errors here:

  • You don't return DoStuff as module interface
  • instance_var is not declared, probably meant public_instance_var
  • doOtherStuff is never assigned to Module, just call it like doOtherStuff();

Fixed code:

var Module = function () {
    var public_instance_var;

    function doStuff() {
        doOtherStuff();
        console.log(public_instance_var); // expected: true, but logs undefined
    };

    function doOtherStuff() {
        public_instance_var = true;
    };

    return {
        doStuff: doStuff,
        public_instance_var: public_instance_var
    }
}();

Module.doStuff();
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public_instance_var : instance_var reveals a public pointer to the private property public_instance_var and is thus correct in my code. The rest of your observation seem correct. –  Sir Ben Benji Aug 1 '12 at 9:46
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change your code like so

var Module = function () {
    var public_instance_var;

    function doStuff () {
        doOtherStuff();
        console.log("var is ", public_instance_var); // expected: true, but logs undefined
    };

    function doOtherStuff() {
        public_instance_var = true;
    };

    return {
        public_instance_var: public_instance_var,
        doStuff : doStuff
    }
}();

Module.doStuff();
  • you have to return doStuff() function (otherwise outside it will be undefined) and public_instance_var instead of instance_var
  • you need to execute doOtherStuff() without prefixing Module.
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What this code does is, simply put: create and run a function and assign its return value to a variable: Module. The return value is an object with 1 property: public_instance_var, that points to the variable instance_var, or (after correcting the typo: public_instance_var). This variable was declared, but not instantiated. Therefore the return value looks like this:

Module.public_instance_var = undefined

The very last line Module.doStuff(); won't work one bit: Module is an object that has no methods. The functions you declared are garbage collected when the anonymous function returns. If you want access to those functions, you'll need to include them in the return statement. Read up on closures, Object constructors and design patterns in general, but I'd say the code you're after will look something like this:

var Module = (function()
    var public_instance_var;
    function doStuff () {
        this.doOtherStuff();
        console.log(public_instance_var); // expected: true, but logs undefined
    };
    function doOtherStuff() {
        public_instance_var = true;
    };
    return {
        public_instance_var: public_instance_var,
        doStuff: doStuff,
        doOtherStuff: doOtherStuff
    };
})();

Of course, this way your variable public_instance_var is a public property, so my guess would be what you're really trying to do is simulate a private properties and methods. In which case you might end up with code similar to this:

var Module = (function()
{
    var public_instance_var;
    return {
        //public_instance_var: public_instance_var, remove this line
        //the closure will preserve access to the variable
        doStuff: function ()
        {
            this.doOtherStuff();//this, you're referencing the object's property
            console.log('here I am');
        },
        doOtherStuff: function ()
        {
            public_instance_var = true;
            //this won't work anymore:
            //this.public_instance_var = true;
        };
    }
})();

Module.doStuff() now logs here I am, but the doOtherStuff is now a public method, too. Here's how you might choose to solve the issue:

var Module = (function()
{
    var public_instance_var;
    function doOtherStuff ()
    {
        public_instance_var = true;
    };
    return {
        //public_instance_var: public_instance_var, remove this line
        //the closure will preserve access to the variable
        doStuff: function ()
        {
            doOtherStuff();//don't use this here, but the reference to the function exists thanks to closure
            console.log('here I am');
            console.log(public_instance_var);//logs true
        }
    };
})();

These are just a few of the very powerful things you can do with closures and functions returning objects.
Just read a couple of articles, like this one, there are better ones out there. Google the term power constructors

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