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Suppose to have the code

#include <iostream>

struct A{
  int y;
  int& x;
  A():y(0),x(y){}
};



void f(int& x){
  x++;
}

void g(const A& a){
  f(a.x);
  //f(a.y);
}


int main(){
  A a;
  g(a);
  std::cout<<a.y<<std::endl;

}

inside g() calling f() on y is not allowed because a is passed with the const modifier however, the value of y can be modified inside g() by calling f on x;

With pointers, a similar things can be obtained very similarly

struct B{
  int* x;  
}

and

g(const B&){
   *x++;
}

is allowed. This is perfectly clear: We have a const pointer to non-const int. But in the previous reference example, if references ARE the object, why do in this case they behave as pointers? What are the design policies under this behavior?

share|improve this question
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/2431596/… is the same issue; it may not go far enough into the motivation though. –  ecatmur Jul 31 '12 at 12:16
    
@ecatmur : Thank you, this is exactly the same, I will link it, but, as you state, the reply does not go much further than "because it is like with pointers" –  Fabio Dalla Libera Jul 31 '12 at 12:20
1  
References aren't the object, they are a reference to an object. –  ereOn Jul 31 '12 at 12:21
    
@ereOn I agree,but see for instance stackoverflow.com/questions/728233/… –  Fabio Dalla Libera Jul 31 '12 at 12:25
    
@FabioDallaLibera: I read it. Note that the "is" in the accepted answer is emphased, indicating that care is required when interpreting this sentence. It is sometimes acceptable to see a reference as being the object in some particular cases as it simplifies the logic. However, it is important to remember that references are still a different beast most of the time. –  ereOn Jul 31 '12 at 12:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The actual language in the standard is

8.3.2 References [dcl.ref]

1 - [...] [ Note: A reference can be thought of as a name of an object. —end note ]

So if a reference is a name of an object, not an object itself, then it makes sense that causing the enclosing structure to be const makes the name const (which is meaningless, as references can't be rebound), but not the object itself.

We also see

6 - If a typedef, a type template-parameter, or a decltype-specifier denotes a type TR that is a reference to a type T, an attempt to create the type “lvalue reference to cv TR” creates the type “lvalue reference to T” [...]

Since member access on a cv object creates a cv lvalue, the same applies and the cv qualification is extinguished.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. And I think @Useless comment adds an important thing here: making a reference itself const isn't very useful: since they're non-reseatable, they can't be mutated like pointers in any case. –  Fabio Dalla Libera Jul 31 '12 at 12:29
    
Thank you! Here is point 6 in action: typedef int& C; template<typename X> struct V{ const X& x; V(X& px):x(px){} }; int main(){ int x; C c(x); V<C> v(c); v.x=3; } –  Fabio Dalla Libera Jul 31 '12 at 12:51

if references ARE the object

references are not objects though - they're references to objects.

You're right that making a reference itself const isn't very useful: since they're non-reseatable, they can't be mutated like pointers in any case.

In fact, it might be more helpful to think of a reference as a const pointer (not a pointer-to-const!) with special syntax.

Note that if you want an indirection which does propogate constness from the referee to the referent (ie, to prevent the f(a.x) call here), you can write a smart pointer-style thing to do it.


Concrete example

struct A
{
    int x;
    int *p;
    int &r;

    A() : x(0), p(&x), r(x) {}
};

Now in A a:

  • a.x is a mutable int
  • a.p is a mutable pointer (so we can reseat it) to a mutable int (we can change the value of the integer it points to)
  • and a.r is a reference to a mutable int
    • note that since we can't mutate (reseat) references anyway, it doesn't mean anything for the reference itself to be either const or mutable

... but in const A b:

  • b.x is a constant integer
  • b.p is a constant pointer (so we can't reseat it) to a mutable int
  • b.r is a reference to a mutable int
    • note how the constness is applied to the member of A (the pointer or reference) and does not propogate through to the referent.
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I like your answer. Now a further step. struct B{ int* x; } Now, a const B is the same as a B with a int* const; However with struct C{ int& x; } x is not a const int&. How would you call it? –  Fabio Dalla Libera Jul 31 '12 at 12:33
    
Nope, a const B has a const member x, which is to say int * const B::x. The member is a pointer, so the const member is a const pointer not a pointer-to-const. So, you can still modify whatever x points to, but you can't modify x (by re-seating it). –  Useless Jul 31 '12 at 12:35
    
Thank you. I marked @ecatmur response for reporting standard's excerpts, but I could mark your answer as accpted answer as well. I'll add up points –  Fabio Dalla Libera Jul 31 '12 at 12:52

In C++ references are usually implemented by pointers. (I think that the sizeof a reference and pointer are the same).

Indeed I usually think of references as pointers, but with different syntax.

share|improve this answer
1  
"I think that the sizeof a reference and pointer are the same" Nope –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jul 31 '12 at 12:21
    
I do too, although many people are strongly against it, see for instance stackoverflow.com/questions/728233/… –  Fabio Dalla Libera Jul 31 '12 at 12:23
    
@Cheersandhth.-Alf Are you saying that they are never the same or just sometimes? –  quamrana Jul 31 '12 at 12:26
    
@quamrana sizeof(T&) is identically the same as sizeof(T). it has no relationship to the size of a pointer. the size of memory used for a reference may be 0 or the same as for T*, or something else, at the compiler's discretion, and is not available via sizeof (to check it you can place a reference in a struct, say). –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jul 31 '12 at 12:49

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