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to copy at the correct place but doesn't stop after the count is reached. I thought my code should work as follows

char har *orig, int start, int count, char *final);

int main(void)
{
    const char source[] = "one two three";
    char result[] = "123456789012345678";

    printf("%s\n",GetSubstring(source, 4, 3, result));

    return 0;
}

char r *orig, int start, int count, char *final)
{    
    char *temp = (char *)orig;

    final = temp;


   }

    for ( ; *temp && (count > 0) ; count--)
    {
    rn final;
}
share|improve this question
2  
I'm having a very hard time following what you're doing here; this is a very simple thing to do but you've made it very complicated. The one thing that really confuses me is the "final = temp" line. Presumably, the parameter final holds the destination for the copied string, but you've moved it to point to the original string, so copying any characters will result in some part of the original string being overwritten. I really don't know why you're doing that, so it's hard to recommend any specific changes. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Jul 31 '12 at 12:23
1  
In contrast, Microsoft's implementation of strncpy() -- a standard library function that does basically what you're doing here -- is four lines, one of which is return and one of which is continue. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Jul 31 '12 at 12:26
    
possible duplicate of pointer substrings arrays –  Joachim Pileborg Jul 31 '12 at 12:28
    
if i don't do temp = final the string outputs char result [] 56789012345678, with the temp = final my output is two three, though i though it should just print 'two' and then the count should be reached –  blitzeus Jul 31 '12 at 12:29
1  
@Ernest: "I really don't know why you're doing that" I hate to be so blunt, but, hey, that's where the error is. That was the whole point of this question: to fix it, to find the error. You shouldn't be confused, not if you've been here a while (and you have). Reading inexperienced programmers' minds is pretty much in the job definition here. –  Kuba Ober Jul 31 '12 at 12:51

6 Answers 6

  1. The first for loop doesn't check if temp array exists (how would it check for existence of an allocated memory without asking memory manager in some way?!). The temp is merely a pointer. What you're checking for is that the orig string doesn't have a zero within the first start bytes. That's OK, perhaps' that's what you meant by "existence".

  2. Your intention is to copy from orig to final, yet you reset final to orig. That's where your error is. You must remove that line and it fixes the problem.

  3. You don't need to create the temp pointer, you can use the orig pointer. You're free to modify it -- remember, function arguments are in effects local variables. Function arguments in C are pass-by-value, you implement pass-by-reference by passing pointers (which are values!) to data.

I should add perhaps that the premise of this function is somewhat broken. It "works", but it's not what one might reasonably expect. Notably:

  1. There's no indication that the source string was shorter than start.

  2. There's no indication that the source string was shorter than start + count.

    Perhaps those are OK, but in cases where those conditions could be an error, it should be possible for the user of the function to get an indication of it. The caller would know what's expected and what's not, so the caller can determine it if only you'd provide some feedback to the caller.

  3. You're returning the position that's one past the end of the output -- past the zero-termination. That's not very convenient. If one were to use the returned value to concatenate a subsequent string, it'd have to be decremented by one first.

Below is the fixed code, with sanely named variables.

char *GetSub(const char *src, int start, int count, char *dst)
{
    for ( ; *src && (start > 0) ; start--)
    {
        src++; /* Note: *src++ works too, but is pointless */
    }

    for ( ; *src && (count > 0) ; count--)
    {
        *dst++ = *src++;
    }

    *dst++ = 0;
    return dst; /* Notice: This returns a pointer to the end of the
                memory block you just wrote. Is this intentional? */
}
share|improve this answer
    
While I agree that reusing count and start for the counters 'appears' to save an automatic variable, an optimizing compiler would figure this out on its own. the missing initializer for the fors and the use of start-- and count-- make this a little hard to read. Check out the version I wrote in my answer to know what I mean. –  ArjunShankar Jul 31 '12 at 12:49
1  
By the way, what's with return dst after incrementing it so many times (it might actually have been incremented past the destination array's width)? May I hazard a joke about idiomatic C, and how you shouldn't be trying to answer? ;) –  ArjunShankar Jul 31 '12 at 12:57
    
I think that leveraging pass-by-value semantics of C is the sane way to go in short functions. When a function gets long, it sure helps to have locally declared C99-style loop variables to make the code easy to comprehend. In a short function -- why bother. Of course I agree that the design of this function as written is a bit obscene, but if that's what was called for then, hey, I'm OK with it ;) I know that modern compilers likely won't care any less about extra local variables that are simply copies of arguments. Probably initializer-less for is bad style, though. –  Kuba Ober Jul 31 '12 at 13:04
    
Anyway, the point was to fix the asker's function to get it to work as presumably intended. All it took was to remove one erroneous line. That was what the asker was for. –  Kuba Ober Jul 31 '12 at 13:06
3  
Maybe you should put a comment on the last line to make it clear that you're not returning a pointer to the start of the destination buffer. It's almost certainly an error, so I think calling it 'fixed code' is misleading. –  Sam Jul 31 '12 at 13:10

There are several problems in what you have written. Let's enumerate:

  1. char *temp = (char *)orig; - You're assigning a const char * (you promise not to modify) to a char * (you break that promise). Wrong thing to be doing.

  2. final = temp. No this does not make the original final (the copy held by the caller) change at all. It achieves nothing. It changes your (function's) copy of final to point to the same place that temp is pointing.

  3. *temp++; - There's no point de-referencing it if you're not going to use it. Incrementing it of course, is correct [see comment thread with KubaOber below].

  4. final++ = *temp++; - This is just confusing to read.

  5. *final++ = 0; return final; - You're setting the value at the address final to '0'. Then you're incrementing it (to point to somewhere in space, maybe towards a black hole). Then returning that pointer. Which is also wrong.

What you really should do is to wrap strncpy in a convenient way.

But if you insist to write your own, you'd probably want your function to be something as simple as:

char *GetSub(const char *orig, int start, int count, char *final)
{    
  int i;

  for (i = 0; i < count; i++)
    {
      final[i] = orig[i+start];

      if (final[i] == '\0')
        break;
    }
  final[i] = '\0';

  return final; /* Yes, we just return what we got.  */
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Your #3 is a wrong assessment. You're commenting on idiomatic C code like it was alien to you -- perhaps you shouldn't be? *temp++ is dereferencing the pointer, and incrementing it sometime after the dereference. That's all. –  Kuba Ober Jul 31 '12 at 12:46
    
Okay. It does the reverse. It's an error and I'm going to fix it. –  ArjunShankar Jul 31 '12 at 12:48
    
@KubaOber - The judgement that C is alien to me might be a bit harsh though. –  ArjunShankar Jul 31 '12 at 12:49
    
I can only judge by the comment. There's nothing wrong with that line that you commented on. It's an obvious idiomatic C construct, used correctly in the asker's code. –  Kuba Ober Jul 31 '12 at 12:59
1  
@ArjunShankar, actually, the deferencing part is completely unnecessary. –  Sam Jul 31 '12 at 13:05

The problem is with the following line:

final = temp;

Remove it, and the problem should be resolved.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for a 1 line fix. Although, I hope the OP considers a clean rewrite or even wraps strncpy. –  ArjunShankar Jul 31 '12 at 21:05
char *a="abcdefgh";

i want string "cde" to be copied into another.

index i got is 3(your start).

char *temp=malloc(3*sizeof(char))
strncpy(temp,a+3,3);

is this what you need?

share|improve this answer
    
no, i have to make a custom copy string with the function I used. Im just trying to understand where my logic breaks down –  blitzeus Jul 31 '12 at 12:37

Change your GetSubfunction:

char *GetSub(const char *orig, int start, int count, char *final)
{
    char *temp = (char *)orig;

    // with original final = temp and final++ you loose final valid pointer
    char *final2 = final;


    for ( ; *temp && (start > 0) ; )
    {
        start--;

        // you don't need to dereference temp
        temp++;
    }

    for ( ; *temp && (count > 0) ; count--)
    {
        *final2++ = *temp++;
    }

    *final2 = 0;

    // return a valid pointer
    return final;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Heaven help the poor soul who sees a function with local variables called final and final2. All that's to this code is that there is a source and a destination. All this orig, final naming is counterproductive and poor style. –  Kuba Ober Jul 31 '12 at 13:10
    
@KubaOber, you're right about the bad variable naming, but most of the variable names were defined by the asker. Of course, I agree that 'final2' is a bad name for the variable. However, I think this answer is the most direct one because it explicitly addresses the problem without getting distracted by secondary problems with the code. –  Sam Jul 31 '12 at 13:13

you have some mistakes on your code :

char *GetSub(const char *orig, int start, int count, char *final)
{
    char *temp = (char *)orig;

    //final = temp; /* Why this? */

    for ( ; *temp && (start > 0) ; )
    {
        start--;
        temp++; /* Instead of *temp++ */
    }

    for ( ; *temp && (count > 0) ; count--)
    {
        *final++ = *temp++;
    }

    *(final+count) = '\0';
    return final;
}

Hope this help.

share|improve this answer
    
I think this code is wrong. The last two lines are assuming that 'final' points to the original destination buffer. –  Sam Jul 31 '12 at 13:17
    
@Sam : Why downvote? and which two lines? –  TOC Jul 31 '12 at 13:19
    
The *(final+count) = '\0' line is incorrect because it is setting a value beyond the end of the destination buffer (according to count) to zero. This could result in a buffer overrun. –  Sam Jul 31 '12 at 13:21
    
You're also returning a pointer to what should have been the null terminating character. The author probably wanted the function to return the pointer to the destination buffer. –  Sam Jul 31 '12 at 13:24
    
@Sam : you're wrong! this function return final string which is assumed to be allocated outside this function and have exactly "count" chars length. DOWNVOTE IS ABUSED!! –  TOC Jul 31 '12 at 13:31

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