Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's say I have the following classes set up:

class Foo:
     def __init__(self, frob, frotz):
          self.frobnicate = frob
          self.frotz = frotz
class Bar:
     def __init__(self, frob, frizzle):
          self.frobnicate = frob
          self.frotz = 34
          self.frazzle = frizzle

How can I (if I can at all) use super() in this context to eliminate the duplicate code?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Like this:

class Foo():
    def __init__(self, frob, frotz)
        self.frobnicate = frob
        self.frotz = frotz

class Bar(Foo):
    def __init__(self, frob, frizzle)
        super().__init__(frob, 34)
        self.frazzle = frizzle

Read more here: http://docs.python.org/3.1/library/functions.html#super

EDIT: As said in another answer, sometimes just using Foo.__init__(self, frob, 34) can be the better solution. (For instance, when working with certain forms of multiple inheritance.)

share|improve this answer
9  
Just to be clear, this is only python >= 3.0. For older pythons (but only those with "new-style classes"), @ire_and_curses answer describes what needs to be done. –  Dav Clark Mar 28 '11 at 3:25

Assuming you want class Bar to set the value 34 within its constructor, this would work:

class Foo(object):
     def __init__(self, frob, frotz):
          self.frobnicate = frob
          self.frotz = frotz

class Bar(Foo):
     def __init__(self, frob, frizzle):
          super(Bar,self).__init__(frob,frizzle)
          self.frotz = 34
          self.frazzle = frizzle


bar = Bar(1,2)
print "frobnicate:", bar.frobnicate
print "frotz:", bar.frotz
print "frazzle:", bar.frazzle

However, super() introduces its own complications. See e.g. super considered harmful. For completeness, here's the equivalent version without super().

class Foo(object):
     def __init__(self, frob, frotz):
          self.frobnicate = frob
          self.frotz = frotz

class Bar(Foo):
     def __init__(self, frob, frizzle):

          Foo.__init__(self, frob, frizzle)
          self.frotz = 34
          self.frazzle = frizzle


bar = Bar(1,2)
print "frobnicate:", bar.frobnicate
print "frotz:", bar.frotz
print "frazzle:", bar.frazzle
share|improve this answer
    
why are you setting Bar.frotz = frizzle through the super class constructor then setting it to 34 seperately? shouldn't you just have __init__(frob,34)? –  Victor Jul 23 '09 at 20:03
1  
Yes, that would work too, and would be cleaner. The example is rather contrived (setting a constant in a constructor), but I was trying to stay as close to the original as possible. –  ire_and_curses Jul 23 '09 at 20:58
    
i don't know if that's a good way to do it... consider the case where the super constructor performs an operation on frotz and frizzle is a class, your code won't run or much worse things could happen. –  Victor Jul 23 '09 at 23:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.