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I have a simple contact from that i wish to "POST" via a function but i cant seem to get it to work?

The form works when i have the action send to an external "send.php" file but i wish to keep everything in the one file.

<form action="send()" id="contactform" method="POST">
<p>Name<input type="text" name="name">
  Email
  <input type="text" name="email">
  Phone
  <input type="text" name="phone">
</p>
<p>Message
  <textarea name="message" rows="6" cols="25"></textarea>
  <br />
<input type="submit" value="Send">
</p>
</form>

<?php
function send()
{
$name = $_POST['name'];
$email = $_POST['email'];
$phone = $_POST['phone'];
$message = $_POST['message'];
$formcontent=" From: $name \n  Phone: $phone \n Email: $email \n Message: $message";
$recipient = "ma9ics@gmail.com";
$subject = "Contact Form";
$mailheader = "From: $email \r\n";
mail($recipient, $subject, $formcontent, $mailheader) or die("Error!");
echo "Thank You!";
}
?>
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8 Answers 8

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can't call php code from a <form> tag. Typically you handle this as a "postback" back to the same page, and check if a form variable is set to determine if the postback has happened:

<form action="" id="contactform" method="POST">

Then in your code:

if (isset($_POST['name']))
    send();
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Change form tag to

<form action="" ... >
    ...
</form>

Then call send() after its declaration if $_POST['message'] is set.

The action attribute just tells the browser which web page it should send the information to; it has NOTHING to do with telling it which function to run once it gets there.

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That's not how PHP works :)

To fix your code quickly, you can do this:

  1. take the content of your send() function
  2. cut and paste it in a new .php file (name it at your leisure)
  3. replace action="send()" with action="file_you_just_created.php"
  4. test it out

Basically, HTML forms have no knowledge whatsoever that PHP code even exists, and can't directly reference it.

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The action tag of the HTML form cannot be used to execute PHP code. The action must be a PHP page which will contain code that will be executed to read the POST variables.

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<form action="?" id="contactform" method="POST">
<p>Name<input type="text" name="name">
  Email
  <input type="text" name="email">
  Phone
  <input type="text" name="phone">
</p>
<p>Message
  <textarea name="message" rows="6" cols="25"></textarea>
  <br />
<input type="submit" value="Send">
</p>
</form>

<?php
if ($_POST) {
   send();
}

function send()
{
$name = $_POST['name'];
$email = $_POST['email'];
$phone = $_POST['phone'];
$message = $_POST['message'];
$formcontent=" From: $name \n  Phone: $phone \n Email: $email \n Message: $message";
$recipient = "ma9ics@gmail.com";
$subject = "Contact Form";
$mailheader = "From: $email \r\n";
mail($recipient, $subject, $formcontent, $mailheader) or die("Error!");
echo "Thank You!";
}
?>
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<form action="" id="contactform" method="POST">
<p>Name<input type="text" name="name">
  Email
  <input type="text" name="email">
  Phone
  <input type="text" name="phone">
</p>
<p>Message
  <textarea name="message" rows="6" cols="25"></textarea>
  <br />
<input type="submit" value="Send" name="submit">
</p>
</form>

<?php
if (isset ($_POST["submit"]))
{
    $name = $_POST['name'];
    $email = $_POST['email'];
    $phone = $_POST['phone'];
    $message = $_POST['message'];
    $formcontent=" From: $name \n  Phone: $phone \n Email: $email \n Message: $message";
    $recipient = "ma9ics@gmail.com";
    $subject = "Contact Form";
    $mailheader = "From: $email \r\n";
    mail($recipient, $subject, $formcontent, $mailheader) or die("Error!");
    echo "Thank You!";
}
?>
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Do just this:

<form action="" id="contactform" method="POST">

Or better (valid):

<form action="<?php echo $_SERVER['SCRIPT_FILENAME'] ?>" id="contactform" method="POST">

To catch the data on script check for post data:

<?php 
if (isset($_POST['submit'])) {
    // you should also check if field was filled (strict coding)
    if (isset($_POST['email'])) $email = $_POST['email'];
    ...
}
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The action field would be part of the rendered html. This means, it's static or an attribute for the 'client'. According to the normative, it should also be a valid absolute or relative address. It will work in most (not to say all) cases if you leave it empty though, but it will not validate properly.

The PHP code works on the server that you webpage is hosted in. This means, it is run before you get anything and then your browser receives the html code. Therefore, it needs to be run again after submiting the code, hence you need a page to run it.

Imagine you are in a restaurant. First you order some food to the waiter. This would be you trying to enter X webpage. Then the food is prepared in the kitchen. This would be the PHP code being executed. When the food is ready, the waiter delivers it to you. This is you downloading the information, receiving the html code. You could even change it once it's delivered as you like it (javascript), but this is beyond the scope of your question. Focusing on the OP, would modifying the arrangement of your food (doing something client side) modify what it has ALREADY been done in the kitchen? No, it cannot. The only option is to tell the waiter the changes you want in your food (filling the form) and telling him politely to go to the kitchen and ask for them (this is, WHERE to send the changes). Probably a silly example but it makes the point.

Didn't put code as other's code should fix your problem doubtlessly, I just wanted to explain WHY your code didn't work so you understand html/PHP better.

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