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I'm having some trouble with StreamReader, I have a settings file where I save settings in. I want to open and close the file on a way that I also can handle exceptions.

When the file can't be loaded I want to return for now false.

I created a function that loads the file for me:

    private bool LoadSettingsFile(out StreamReader SettingsFile)
    {
        try
        {
            SettingsFile = new StreamReader("Settings.txt");
            return true;
        }
        catch
        {
            //Going to solve the exception later, but if I can't I want to return false.
            SettingsFile = new StreamReader(); //You need to assign StreamReader, but you need to open a file for that.
            //'System.IO.StreamReader' does not contain a constructor that takes 0 arguments
            return false;
        }
    } 

I call the function on this way:

StreamReader SettingsFile;

if (!LoadSettingsFile(out SettingsFile))
   return false;

How can I avoid or solve this?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you are unable to open the file, why would you want to return a StreamReader instance? Surely you would want to return null. Also, it's never really a good idea to do a catch-all in your exception handling, be more specific e.g.

private bool LoadSettingsFile(out StreamReader settingsFile)
{
    try
    {
         settingsFile = new StreamReader("Settings.txt");
         return true;
    }
    catch (IOException) // specifically handle any IOExceptions       
    {
        settingsFile = null;
        return false;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Where is the stream being closed? –  Dan Puzey Jul 31 '12 at 13:52
    
@DanPuzey Closing the stream inside this method wouldn't make any sense. The stream is being returning therefore it's up to the caller to close it once they have finished with it. Personally I like to wrap disposable stuff up with a using statement, however, in this scenario it's not possible. –  James Jul 31 '12 at 14:00
    
Your post says "you are closing the stream before you pass it back." I don't see why you're saying this: where in the original question is the stream being closed? –  Dan Puzey Jul 31 '12 at 14:02
    
@DanPuzey The OP must have edited his question as there was definitely a call to SettingsFile.Close() after it was being created (otherwise I wouldn't have wrote that...). SO has a 5 minute grace period after your original post so edits don't show up. I have updated my answer based on the change. –  James Jul 31 '12 at 14:05
    
That is correct, I saw it to late that I closed it there. –  Laurence Jul 31 '12 at 16:37

This is arguably bad practise in that, in general, .NET code prefers "throwing exceptions" over "returning failure." The reason for this is that, if you are "returning failure," you rely on the consumer of your code to recognise this and do something about it. If you throw an exception and the consumer of your code ignores it, the application will fail - which is often more desireable than for it to continue in an undefined state.

In your case, the problem is that you're forced to assign to your out parameter even when there is no sensible value to assign there. One obvious suggestion is to assign null instead of trying to fake a StreamReader. Alternatively, you could create an empty MemoryStream and return a reader for that, but this is going to some extreme lengths to cover up the fact that the variable has no meaning in a failure case and should not be set.

Ultimately I'd suggest you allow the exception to bubble rather than returning a bool to indicate failure - or alternatively, return the StreamReader for success and return null in the case of failure.

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I disagree, .NET does not prefer throwing exceptions, it throws exceptions when something unexpected happens which is the standard for any type of programming. If you are attempting to load a file and you expect it may not exist or be corrupt, then what's wrong with trying to handle that situation? (Consider a plugin-style architecture). The OP just has to be more specific with what type of exception they want to catch (which I have suggested in my answer). –  James Jul 31 '12 at 13:19
    
If the behaviour is expected then returning null is sufficient to indicate that there's no available settings; there's no need to have two return values. If this is not an expected scenario then I'd suggest bubbling the exception rather than returning false. I don't think I made that distinction clear enough in my answer. –  Dan Puzey Jul 31 '12 at 13:22
    
There is no harm in returning a boolean to indicate (without checking the value of settingsFile) that the operation was successful. I definitely wouldn't consider it bad practise at least, if that's the case then why does .NET have methods like TryParse on int's doubles etc. Part of programming is also making your development life easier, if your having to check the result of that call everywhere then it would make sense to have it as part of the method. For better readability I would probably name the method more along the lines of TryLoadSettingsFile. –  James Jul 31 '12 at 13:30
    
I disagree. TryParse is necessary because there's no obvious return value for an int (or other value type) that would indicate failure to parse, and the alternative is to catch the exception yourself. This isn't the case with the queestioner's code. Consider: with the bool return you require StreamReader s; if (LoadSettingsFile(out s)) { ...; without the bool you require StreamReader s = LoadSettingsFile(); if (s != null) { .... There's very little to be gained. –  Dan Puzey Jul 31 '12 at 13:37
    
I take your point with regards to null being the obvious return value, however, you could also argue that a TryParse method isn't necessary as they always return a consistent value e.g. -1. So the code you mentioned above could easily be replaced with if (value != -1). Anyway, regardless of that, my point was there is no harm in it and I have never heard or came across any scenarios where something like this would be considered bad practise. –  James Jul 31 '12 at 13:45

Just set SettingsFile = null before entering into the Try/Catch block. Presumably by returning false you're handling this condition at a higher level, so SettingsFile will never be used. So your code would look like this:

   private bool LoadSettingsFile(out StreamReader SettingsFile) 
    { 
        SettingsFile = null;
        try 
        { 
            SettingsFile = new StreamReader("Settings.txt"); 
            return true; 
        } 
        catch 
        { 
            //Handle Exception Here
            return false; 
        } 
    }  
share|improve this answer

You can try

private StreamReader LoadSettingsFile()
{
    try
    {
        return new StreamReader("Settings.txt");
    }
    catch
    {
        return null;
    }
} 

and then

StreamReader sr = LoadSettingsFile();
if (sr == null) return false;
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