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I am facing the following problem:

I defined an abstract class that contains the public generate, clone, etc. methods that must be implemented by the subclass. However I would like to ensure that when these public methods are called certain other methods are also executed within the abstract class.

An obvious solution would be to make a protected abstract method to be implemented and a public non-abstract method that calls the abstract one and all the other methods that I need.

For example:

abstract class Representation {

    public void generate(int variable) {
        myFunction();
        generateAbstract(variable);
    }

    protected abstract void generateAbstract(int variable);

    private void myFunction() {
        //do something
    }
}

My question is how to solve it a nicer way, or if this is the way to go how to name the function in a user-friendly way.

Thanks!

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would do it as you are doing it. I would make the wrapper method either

  1. final so I can't be blown away in a subclass, or
  2. document the hell out of the methods, indicating that the abstract method MUST be called...
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+1 for remembering to discuss final – Duncan Jul 31 '12 at 13:22

Your way of solving this issue is so standard that it even has a name: it is called Template Method Pattern. The idea is to provide a public method that executes the steps of your algorithm at high-level, and use overrides of protected abstract methods in subclasses to deal with lower-level steps of the algorithm. This is the correct way of addressing the problem.

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@dasblinkenlight's answer identifies the design pattern that addresses your problem: Template Method. I like this Template Method link more than the wikipedia entry that answer references. Also, I like answers with code examples:

// Demonstrate the template method design pattern
// straight out of GoF example
abstract class AbstractClass {
    // Final ensures extender does not override, but depends on your design
    final void templateMethod() {
        primitiveOperation1();
        primitiveOperation2();
    }

    // document extenders should keep as protected
    // so clients do not call directly
    protected abstract void primitiveOperation1();
    protected abstract void primitiveOperation2();
}

public class ConcreteClass extends AbstractClass {
    @Override
    protected void primitiveOperation1() {
        System.out.println("ConcreteClass.primitiveOperation1()");
    }

    @Override
    protected void primitiveOperation2() {
        System.out.println("ConcreteClass.primitiveOperation2()");
    }
}
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I think your suggested method is quite elegant enough. I've certainly solved the same problem in this way before. I'd possibly call your method doGenerate() (or something without the word Abstract in it).

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I think the easiest way to do this would be to ensure that super.generate is called. Since Java doesn't have a good mechanism for informing a class of when it has been subclassed (others like Ruby do), there's not much you can do to force a subclass that implements an abstract method to call another method.

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You cannot ensure super.generate is called. I think the option described in the original post, plus @hvgotcodes addition of final is the answer. Anything else leaves the matter up to documentation and well behaving developers (shudder). – Duncan Jul 31 '12 at 13:28

As pointed out before, what you suggested is the correct approach according to the Template method pattern. What is left is the naming issue. I would not call the function to be overwritten "generateAbstract" because when it is implemented it is not abstract anymore. I recommend something like "makeGenerate()" which reflects the original function and implies what it does.

abstract class Representation {

  public void generate(int variable) {
    myFunction();
    makeGenerate(variable);
  }

  protected abstract void generateAbstract(int variable);

  private void myFunction() {
    //do something
  }
}

public class ConcreteClass extends Representation {
  @Override
  protected void makeGenerate() {
    ...
  }
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