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I'm trying to learn SQL, using PostgreSQL 9.1.3. I would like to understand some behavior that strikes me as inconsistent. To wit:

This works:

WITH innermost AS (SELECT 2)
SELECT * FROM innermost
UNION SELECT 3;

I get this:

 ?column? 
----------
        2
        3

This works:

WITH outmost AS (
        (WITH innermost AS (SELECT 2)
         SELECT * FROM innermost)
)                                
SELECT * FROM outmost;

Result:

?column? 
----------
        2

This also works:

WITH outmost AS (
  SELECT 1
  UNION (WITH innermost AS (SELECT 2)
         SELECT * FROM innermost)
)
SELECT * FROM outmost;

I get this:

 ?column? 
----------
        1
        2

But this does not work:

WITH outmost AS (
  SELECT 1
  UNION (WITH innermost as (SELECT 2)
         SELECT * FROM innermost
         UNION SELECT 3)
)
SELECT * FROM outmost;

Result:

ERROR:  relation "innermost" does not exist
LINE 4:          SELECT * FROM innermost

To my way of thinking, either the last one should succeed or one of the other ones should fail. I don't see the pattern. Is there some general rule that would enable me to predict what combinations of nested CTEs and UNIONs will or will not work?

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Though your final query looks awkward, it should be Ok, IMHO. It could be a precedence/associativity error in the parser. There are some semantic restrictions (No nested recursive CTEs, IIRC); maybe the parser is too picky, or too trigger-happy. Personally, I use a lot of nested CTEs (up to 4 levels deep), but I rarely use UNION, except for in the recursive CTEs. –  wildplasser Jul 31 '12 at 16:24
2  
@AdamMackler you should put that in as the answer to your own question –  araqnid Jul 31 '12 at 19:55
3  
Tom Lane acknowledging you found a bug, is something like an official approval that you asked a very good question. Please post what you got from the list as answer and be sure to add a link to the thread. –  Erwin Brandstetter Aug 1 '12 at 0:01
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1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The mystery is solved: the behavior I was observing is a known bug. I sent the same original post to a PostgreSQL-specific list and got this answer:

This is a bug :-(. The parse analysis code seems to think that WITH can only be attached to the top level or a leaf-level SELECT within a set operation tree; but the grammar follows the SQL standard which says no such thing. The WITH gets accepted, and attached to the intermediate-level UNION which is where syntactically it should go, and then it's entirely ignored during parse analysis. Will see about fixing it.

      regards, tom lane

http://archives.postgresql.org/pgsql-novice/2012-07/msg00113.php

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1  
Seems like this has been fixed in 9.2 beta3. I quote the newsletter: * Fix WITH issue with set operations (UNION/INTERSECT/EXCEPT). –  Erwin Brandstetter Aug 7 '12 at 8:12
1  
I just installed 9.2beta3 and yes, the nonworking command in my original post does now work as expected. Thank you for the heads up. –  Adam Mackler Aug 11 '12 at 23:38
    
Cool! Thank you for tracking this down! Your question deserves more upvotes. :) BTW, it's encouraged to accept your own (correct) answer in such a case. –  Erwin Brandstetter Aug 12 '12 at 0:53
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