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I need a specialised hash function h(X,Y) in Java with the following properties.

  1. X and Y are strings.
  2. h(X,Y) = h(Y,X).
  3. X and Y are arbitrary length strings and there is no length limit on the result of h(X,Y) either.
  4. h(X,Y) and h(Y,X) should not collide with h(A,B) = h(B,A) if X is not equal to A and Y is not equal to B.
  5. h() does not need to be a secure hash function unless it is necessary to meet the aforementioned requirements.
  6. Fairly high-performant but this is an open-ended criterion.

In my mind, I see requirements 2 and 4 slightly contradictory but perhaps I am worrying too much.

At the moment, what I am doing in Java is the following:

public static BigInteger hashStringConcatenation(String str1, String str2) {
    BigInteger bA = BigInteger.ZERO;
    BigInteger bB = BigInteger.ZERO;
    for(int i=0; i<str1.length(); i++) {
        bA = bA.add(BigInteger.valueOf(127L).pow(i+1).multiply(BigInteger.valueOf(str1.codePointAt(i))));
    }
    for(int i=0; i<str2.length(); i++) {
        bB = bB.add(BigInteger.valueOf(127L).pow(i+1).multiply(BigInteger.valueOf(str2.codePointAt(i))));
    }
    return bA.multiply(bB);
}

I think this is hideous but that's why I am looking for nicer solutions. Thanks.

Forgot to mention that on a 2.53GHz dual core Macbook Pro with 8GB RAM and Java 1.6 on OS X 10.7, the hash function takes about 270 micro-seconds for two 8 (ASCII) character Strings. I suspect this would be higher with the increase in the String size, or if Unicode characters are used.

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I have given it a good thought... And @Anirban I believe you've a pretty neat implementation. Good Work. –  SiB Jul 31 '12 at 14:03
    
@BharatSinha, thanks but I am working with hideously large precision numbers, which is a worry regarding performance. Plus, the return statement code read return bA.add(bB) instead. My main concern is, however, what is the probability that my solution breaks requirement 4. –  xtremebytes Jul 31 '12 at 14:08
    
Well As far as I can see the design of the method; it looks perfect... Since you are adding the powers of 127 so I don't see a chance of sum coming the same... –  SiB Jul 31 '12 at 14:30
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10 Answers 10

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Today I've decided to add my solution for this hash function problem. It was not tested very good and I did not measure its performance, so you can feed me back with your comments. My solution is situated below:

public abstract class HashUtil {
    //determines that we want hash, that has size of 32 integers ( or 32*32 bits )
    private static final int hash_size = 32;

    //some constants that can be changed in sake of avoiding collisions
    private static final BigInteger INITIAL_HASH = BigInteger.valueOf(7);
    private static final BigInteger HASH_MULTIPLIER = BigInteger.valueOf(31);
    private static final BigInteger HASH_DIVIDER = BigInteger.valueOf(2).pow(32*hash_size);

    public static BigInteger computeHash(String arg){
        BigInteger hash = new BigInteger(INITIAL_HASH.toByteArray());
        for (int i=0;i<arg.length()/hash_size+1;i++){
            int[] tmp = new int[hash_size];
            for(int j=0;j<Math.min(arg.length()-32*i,32);j++){
                tmp[i]=arg.codePointAt(i*hash_size+j);
            }
            hash = hash.multiply(HASH_MULTIPLIER).add(new BigInteger(convert(tmp)).abs()).mod(HASH_DIVIDER);
        }
        //to reduce result space to something meaningful
        return hash;
    }

    public static BigInteger computeHash(String arg1,String arg2){
        //here I don't forgot about reducing of result space
        return computeHash(arg1).add(computeHash(arg2)).mod(HASH_DIVIDER);
    }

    private static byte[] convert(int[] arg){
        ByteBuffer byteBuffer = ByteBuffer.allocate(arg.length*4);
        IntBuffer intBuffer = byteBuffer.asIntBuffer();
        intBuffer.put(arg);
        return byteBuffer.array();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args){
        String firstString="dslkjfaklsjdkfajsldfjaldsjflaksjdfklajsdlfjaslfj",secondString="unejrng43hti9uhg9rhe3gh9rugh3u94htfeiuwho894rhgfu";
        System.out.println(computeHash(firstString,secondString).equals(computeHash(secondString,firstString)));
    }

}

I suppose that my solution should not produce any collision for single string with length less then 32 (to be more precise, for single string with length less then hash_size variable value). Also it is not very easy to find collisions (as I think). To regulate hash conflicts probability for your particular task you can try another prime numbers instead of 7 and 31 in INITIAL_HASH and HASH_MULTIPLIER variables. What do you think about it? Is it good enought for you?

P.S. I think that it will be much better if you'll try much bigger prime numbers.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @gkuzmin, very much. I tried it and it works! Can't really check for collision. Tried also with big prime numbers (1024-bit) as input strings if that's what you meant? Works that way too. But, the performance (checked in my not-so-proper-way) is slightly slower -- several hundred nanoseconds slower, but I guess due to the chain of method calls in your solution, this delay could result from operating with the call stack, which have nothing to do with the actual performance of your code. –  xtremebytes Aug 3 '12 at 2:36
    
I'd accept this solution but I'm also open to any further betterment. Thanks very much. –  xtremebytes Aug 3 '12 at 2:37
    
Actually there are some places in my code, that can be optimized. For example, arg.length()/hash_size+1 and Math.min(arg.length()-32*i,32) should be computed only once. Also I constantly use getCodePointAt(int) method, and then convert int[] to byte[]. It is not very good, because there is getBytes() method from String class and you can gain some time and memory if you'll decide to use it. To be honest, this code was written very fast and should be refactored. –  gkuzmin Aug 3 '12 at 8:14
    
Also my code was designed to have linear complexity (O(n)), so it may be a little slower on small strings, but should be faster then your solutions for long ones. –  gkuzmin Aug 3 '12 at 8:21
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why not just add their hashCode's together?

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That would not address (4.) I think. –  assylias Jul 31 '12 at 13:41
    
Thanks. Yes, thought of that but the strings are arbitrary length, which means that hashCode() will generate several collisions as the strings get larger. The value of hashCode() is in the form of a Java int, so that 32-bit signed integer can't really have so many different values before it starts repeating itself. The sum or product will only make things worse. In my example code, I'm working with a BigInteger so I am allowing for arbitrary growth in the integer precision. –  xtremebytes Jul 31 '12 at 13:41
    
well. That is the whole point of hash functions. to represent something with a small number will cause collisions, but the point is to minimize the collisions for a certain dataset. you would have to have atleast tens of millions of strings before you get too much collisions with a 32bit hash. –  Markus Mikkolainen Jul 31 '12 at 13:46
1  
If you dont allow for some collisions, you are actually designing a compression algorithm and not a hash.. –  Markus Mikkolainen Jul 31 '12 at 13:47
    
Agree with your point about hash functions but 32-bit hash is too small for the sort of string data I am expecting in this case. That's a problem. –  xtremebytes Jul 31 '12 at 13:59
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3) h(X,Y) and h(Y,X) should not collide with h(A,B) = h(B,A) if X is not equal to A and Y is not equal to B.

I think that this requirement rules any hash function that produces numbers that are smaller (on average) than the original Strings.

Any requirement of no collisions runs into the roadblock of the Pigeonhole Principle.

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Okay, right. Then, how about minimize the collisions but certainly a 32-bit hash is susceptible to too many collisions, right? –  xtremebytes Jul 31 '12 at 14:01
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How strict are you being with requirement 4? If the answer is 'not completely strict' then you could just concatenate the two strings putting the smaller one first (this would result in a collision for h('A', 'B') and h('AB', ''))

If there are any characters which you are sure would never appear in the string values then you could use a single instance as a separator, which would fix the collision above.

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h('A', 'B') and h('AB, '')) won't collide. –  SiB Jul 31 '12 at 13:45
    
Thought of this but it will horribly break 4 not only for (A, B) and ('AB', '') but any combination there of...For example: ("Hello","Worlds") and ("Hell","oWorlds") will result in the same hash. –  coolest_head Jul 31 '12 at 13:49
    
Requirement 4 is quite strict. However, if you concatenate strings with the + operator in Java, won't it break requirement 2? For example, I want h("Hello","World") = h("World","Hello") but not equal to h("Hell", "oWorld"). –  xtremebytes Jul 31 '12 at 13:54
    
@coolest_head the method used by @Anirban Basu will not break for ("Hello","Worlds") and ("Hell","oWorlds") as well. The loop is reinitialized at 0 for every string. –  SiB Jul 31 '12 at 14:01
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From 4-th point we can get that h(x,"") should never collide with h(y,"") until x.equals(y) is true. So, you have no size limits on what produce h(x,y), cause it shoud produce unique result for each unique x. But there are infinite number of unique strings. This is not a correct hash function, I think.

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If the definition of a "hash function" strictly says that the input ought to be compacted within a pre-specified bit length for the output, e.g., 256 bits for SHA-256 then no, I am not looking for a hash function but an encoding function instead. I do not have any limitation on the size of the output so long as it is not going to take a serious toll on performance. –  xtremebytes Jul 31 '12 at 14:11
    
From you task definition it is absolutely clear that you should store something realy close to source strings to distinct h(x,"") and h(y,""). Moreover, you should not ignore any significat bit. So you should store something realy realy close to strings. So, why don't you store strings as hashes itself? It will be nice because you shuld not compute hash. Just store 2 links. Strings will represent their hash itselfs. Moreover, string comparator has good enought performance and I think, that it is unlikely that you can invent some algorithm with better memory and cpu consumption. –  gkuzmin Jul 31 '12 at 14:31
    
Generally speaking, 4-th point from your task definition is a cornerstone that will produce huge memory consuming. And in case of computations like one from yours algorithm h(x,y) will consume a lot of cpu time, wich will increase in non linear way. –  gkuzmin Jul 31 '12 at 14:37
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Building on String#hashCode, this is not a perfect hash function, so it does not fulfill condition 4.

public static long hashStringConcatenation(String str1, String str2) {
    int h1 = str1.hashCode();
    int h2 = str2.hashCode();

    if ( h1 < h2 )
    {
        return ((long)h1)<<32 & h2;
    }
    else
    {
        return ((long)h2)<<32 & h1;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. So, that generates a 64-bit hash? Got to think through and test this out (tomorrow). –  xtremebytes Jul 31 '12 at 14:02
    
Since you've used .hashCode() on the String, wouldn't it possibly generate collisions over millions of arbitrary length strings, and thereby break requirement 4? –  xtremebytes Jul 31 '12 at 14:13
    
Yes, obviously. I did not read requirement 4 initially as you wanting a perfect hash function, but rather "not worse than java default hash". –  nabcos Jul 31 '12 at 14:20
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Okay, @gkuzmin's comment made me think why I am doing the powers of 127. So, here's a slightly simpler version of the code. The changes are as follows:

  1. I am no longer doing the powers of 127 but actually concatenating the codePointAt numbers as strings, converting the result into BigInteger for each input string and then adding the two BigIntegers.
  2. To compact the answer, I am doing a mod 2^1024 on the final answer.

Speed is not any better (perhaps a little worse!) but then I think the way I am measuring the speed is not right because it probably also measures the time taken for the function call.

Here's the modified code. Does this fulfill all conditions, albeit 4 for such unfortunate cases where repetitions may occur over the 2^1024 result space?

public static BigInteger hashStringConcatenation(String str1, String str2) {
    if(str1==null || str1.isEmpty() || str2 == null || str2.isEmpty()) {
        return null;
    }
    BigInteger bA, bB;
    String codeA = "", codeB = "";
    for(int i=0; i<str1.length(); i++) {
        codeA += str1.codePointAt(i);
    }
    for(int i=0; i<str2.length(); i++) {
        codeB += str2.codePointAt(i);
    }
    bA = new BigInteger(codeA);
    bB = new BigInteger(codeB);
    return bA.add(bB).mod(BigInteger.valueOf(2).pow(1024));
}
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I've decided to add another answer because @Anirban Basu have proposed another solution. So, I do not know how to provide link to his post and if somebody know how to do it - correct me.

Anirban's solution looks like this:

public static BigInteger hashStringConcatenation(String str1, String str2) {
    if(str1==null || str1.isEmpty() || str2 == null || str2.isEmpty()) {
        return null;
    }
    BigInteger bA, bB;
    String codeA = "", codeB = "";
    for(int i=0; i<str1.length(); i++) {
        codeA += str1.codePointAt(i);
    }
    for(int i=0; i<str2.length(); i++) {
        codeB += str2.codePointAt(i);
    }
    bA = new BigInteger(codeA);
    bB = new BigInteger(codeB);
    return bA.add(bB).mod(BigInteger.valueOf(2).pow(1024));
}

Your new solution now looks like a hash function, but it still has some problems. I suggest that you should think about this:

  1. Maybe it will be better to throw NullPointerException or IllegalArgumentException when null was used as function argument? Are you sure, that you do not want to compute hash for empty strings?
  2. To concatenate large amount of strings it is better to use StringBuffer instead of + operator. Use of this class will produce huge positive impact on your code performance.
  3. Your hash function is not very secure - it is realy easy to compute strings, which will produce conflict.

You can try this code to check algorithm that can can demonstrate your hash function collision.

public static void main(String[] args){
    String firstString=new StringBuffer().append((char)11).append((char)111).toString();
    String secondString=new StringBuffer().append((char)111).append((char)11).toString();

    BigInteger hash1 = hashStringConcatenation(firstString,"arbitrary_string");
    BigInteger hash2 = hashStringConcatenation(secondString,"arbitrary_string");
    System.out.println("Is hash equal: "+hash1.equals(hash2));
    System.out.println("Conflicted values: {"+firstString+"},{"+secondString+"}");
}

So, It is realy easy to break your hash function. Moreover, it is good that it has 2^1024 result space, but a lot of real life conflicts for your implementation lies in very close and simple strings.

P.S. I think that you should read something about already developed hash algorithms, hash function that failed in a real life (like java String class hash function which computed hash using only 16 first characters in the past) and try to examine your solutions according to your requirements and real life. At least you can try to find hash conflict manually and if you succeed then your solution most likely already has some problems.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @gkuzmin for your suggestions. Actually, I figured that in both my solutions, I have collision problems. For non-disclosure reasons, I cannot show the data I am working with but when dealing with a few hundred thousand string operations with strings that are only marginally different, the hash/encoding function generates collisions. So, I am back at square one! –  xtremebytes Aug 2 '12 at 2:42
    
No, that's not entirely true. It may be that I saw collisions because of reasons that I do not really understand. Okay, those hashes serve as primary keys in MySQL, which stores it as varchar(256) but that allows for 256 characters in the hash. The type of things I was storing should really not exceed that number of characters to cause any duplication issue due to clipping. Anyway, I have now modified the code and will add it as a separate response. –  xtremebytes Aug 2 '12 at 3:33
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Here's my changed code according to @gkuzmin's suggestion:

public static BigInteger hashStringConcatenation(String str1, String str2) {
    BigInteger bA = BigInteger.ZERO, bB = BigInteger.ZERO;
    StringBuffer codeA = new StringBuffer(), codeB = new StringBuffer();
    for(int i=0; i<str1.length(); i++) {
        codeA.append(str1.codePointAt(i));
    }
    for(int i=0; i<str2.length(); i++) {
        codeB.append(str2.codePointAt(i));
    }
    bA = new BigInteger(codeA.toString());
    bB = new BigInteger(codeB.toString());
    return bA.multiply(bB).mod(BigInteger.valueOf(2).pow(1024));
}

Note that in the result, I now multiply bA with bB instead of adding.

Also, added @gkuzmin's suggested test function:

public static void breakTest2() {
    String firstString=new StringBuffer().append((char)11).append((char)111).toString();
    String secondString=new StringBuffer().append((char)111).append((char)11).toString();
    BigInteger hash1 = hashStringConcatenation(firstString,"arbitrary_string");
    BigInteger hash2 = hashStringConcatenation(secondString,"arbitrary_string");
    System.out.println("Is hash equal: "+hash1.equals(hash2));
    System.out.println("Conflicted values: {"+firstString+"},{"+secondString+"}");
}

and another test with strings having only numeric values:

public static void breakTest1() {
    Hashtable<String,String> seenTable = new Hashtable<String,String>();
    for (int i=0; i<100; i++) {
        for(int j=i+1; j<100; j++) {
            String hash = hashStringConcatenation(""+i, ""+j).toString();
            if(seenTable.contains(hash)) {
                System.out.println("Duplication for " + seenTable.get(hash) + " with " + i + "-" + j);
            }
            else {
                seenTable.put(hash, i+"-"+j);
            }
        }
    }
}

The code runs. Of course, it is not an exhaustive check, but the breakTest1() function does not have any issues. @gkuzmin's function displays the following:

Is hash equal: true
Conflicted values: {                    o},{o                         }

Why do the two strings produce the same hash? Because they are effectively working with strings '11111arbitrary_string' in both cases. This is a problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Okay, so the problem is if we have a string for either of the arguments of the function such that the concatenation of their character codes, e.g., {abcd} is indistinguishable from any other combination, e.g., {acbd} or {dbca} then it breaks requirement 4. So, I'll now post a slight modification of the code, which I believe solves the problem. –  xtremebytes Aug 2 '12 at 5:31
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How about the slightly modified function now?

public static BigInteger hashStringConcatenation(String str1, String str2) {
    BigInteger bA = BigInteger.ZERO, bB = BigInteger.ZERO;
    StringBuffer codeA = new StringBuffer(), codeB = new StringBuffer();
    for(int i=0; i<str1.length(); i++) {
        codeA.append(str1.codePointAt(i)).append("0");
    }
    for(int i=0; i<str2.length(); i++) {
        codeB.append(str2.codePointAt(i)).append("0");
    }
    bA = new BigInteger(codeA.toString());
    bB = new BigInteger(codeB.toString());
    return bA.multiply(bB).mod(BigInteger.valueOf(2).pow(1024));
}

Here, we add a separator character "0" between each character codes, so the combination for characters 11 111 and 111 11 will no longer confuse the function because the concatenation will produce 110111 and 111011. However, it still will not break requirement 2 of the original question.

So does this now solve the problem albeit within the limits of the 2^1024 range?

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Not much better. You can try String firstString=new StringBuffer().append((char)303).append((char)30303).toString(); and String secondString=new StringBuffer().append((char)30303).append((char)303).toString(); for my previous code. String firstString=new StringBuffer().append((char)303).append((char)3).toString(); and String secondString=new StringBuffer().append((char)3).append((char)303).toString(); works too. And it shows hash collisions for short strings already –  gkuzmin Aug 2 '12 at 8:03
    
You are right. Should have noticed. Any positive integer used as a padding between each character code has the ability to generate this problem. Perhaps not beyond the Unicode range but then it is quite unwise to pad with such huge integers. Will check your solution soon. Thanks. –  xtremebytes Aug 2 '12 at 13:47
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