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What is the most efficient way to make all nested list items the same size while using an em that is not equal to 1. For example, I want all li's in this list to be sized to 0.85em of the ul's parent. Do I have to create a separate class for each "level" of depth?

<html>
<head>
    <style type="text/css">
        li
    	{
    		font-size: 0.85em;
    	}
    </style>
</head>
<body>
    <ul>
        <li>Level 1 item
            <ul>
                <li>Level 2 item
                    <ul>
                        <li>Level 3 item</li>
                    </ul>
                </li>
            </ul>
        </li>
    </ul>
</body>
</html>
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up vote 6 down vote accepted

Should work.

li li {font-size: 100%;}
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1  
It does, but it's not the most efficient way. – Bobby Jack Jul 23 '09 at 20:45
    
@Bobby, why is it not the most efficient way? – You Jul 30 '09 at 22:27
    
Without adding extra markup to your page this is the easiest way. – Matt Jul 31 '09 at 16:17

Use the "rem" unit for font sizing. This fixes the font-inheritance problem.

Johnathan Snook has a great article on this.

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Yes, it's indeed the best method. I can add only you should use fall-back value using pixels. Like this: li {font-size: 8.5px; font-size: 0.85em;} And you should set base font size not on body element as usually but on html. – Mike Eshva Oct 29 '11 at 2:49
1  
@MikeEshva: your css example should be {font-size: 8.5px; font-size: 0.85rem;} – chotchki Oct 29 '11 at 18:33
    
yeah, the order matters! – its_me Jan 22 '12 at 16:39
    
That is a very good article! Thank you mate! – Dimitris Damilos Feb 22 '13 at 13:10
    
Note that "rem" is only available on IE9+ – Travis Jun 4 '14 at 14:00

I want all li's in this list to be sized to 0.85em of the ul's parent

body > ul { font-size: 0.85em; }

would do that

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My recommendation would be to give the first <ul> an id or class, and set the font-size there.

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(This answer assumes you want all li-elements the same size (you say both that you want the the same size, and different size in the question))

Font-size cascades, so if you just set it on the outer element (say a wrapper div or something), everything inside it will get one step smaller like (I think) you want to.

<div id="navigation">
    <ul>
        <li>...</li>
        <li>
        <ul><li>...</li><li>...</li></ul>
        </li>
    </ul>
</div>

#navigation { font-size: 0.85em; }
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The example above works as it should though. Even in IE6, that doesn't support the child selector. – Emil Stenström Jul 23 '09 at 20:22
    
True - I was working with the HTML he gave us. He didn't specify browser compatibility, so I'm assuming he wants something that adheres to the CSS2.1 spec. – Bobby Jack Jul 23 '09 at 20:34
    
Where in the question does he say that he wants them to be different sizes? – Bobby Jack Jul 23 '09 at 20:46
    
"make all nested list items the same size" vs. "all li's in this list to be sized to 0.85em of the ul's parent". I'm leaning towards the first, but I can't be sure, and for some reason people are downvoting my answer, so I'm just trying to clarify. – Emil Stenström Jul 23 '09 at 20:51
    
Fair enough; I've un-downvoted your answer because this seems like a genuine misunderstanding, and your answer does work. But I think it's quite clear - "make all nested list items the same size" means, I assume, "... as each other". The other quote simply states that they should ALL be the computed value of 0.85em of the base font size - there's no inconsistency that I can see. – Bobby Jack Jul 23 '09 at 21:04

I agree with Emil, and would vote him up on this if I had enough rep points (n00b here). I would use a class like he mentions in his first point, so its re-usable in the same document. If you want cross browser and are using the current css spec then I cant suggest a better real world example..... roll on css 3 and the death of IE6 !

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Thanks for the moral support! :) – Emil Stenström Jul 23 '09 at 21:32
    
Its how I would do it, and I think it was unfair to mark you down for actually being right and giving good advice – Crayonz Jul 24 '09 at 13:48
li { font-size: 0.85em; }
li li { font-size: 1em; }
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