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I've run into a problem where a field in my class is not accessible by the constructor in it's .cpp file, for reasons unknown to me the .cpp doesn't inherit it and I cannot construct it for use in the rest of my program
Here is the class containing the fields I wish to construct in Test.h

class Test
{
public:
    Test();
    virtual ~Test();
    void count();
    int counter();
};

And here is the constructor for the field 'counter' in Test.cpp

Test::Test() : counter(0){}

To my knowledge of C++ this should be correct as Test.cpp contains #include "Test.h" and the exact same code works when writing and construction classes when using just main.cpp and no headers, any ideas?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

int counter(); is a function declaration. remove the ().

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Awesome! Thank you very much, did as you said and also had to change Test::Test() : counter(0){} to Test::Test(){ counter = 0; } now it works perfectly ^^ and about me using () after declaring an integer... smacks self I need to get myself out of the Javascript mindset, been using Unity3D too much recently –  TotalJargon Jul 31 '12 at 13:48
2  
@TotalJargon, Why did you have to move the other part? It was fine. In fact, it should be preferred. –  chris Jul 31 '12 at 13:50
    
@TotalJargon all the answers were in the comments to your previous thread! –  juanchopanza Jul 31 '12 at 13:53
    
no, my problem was that I was dumb enough to create 'counter' as a method instead of a variable, you helped me out a lot but I thought it may have been a more serious problem, I'll delete the thread if you think it's best but as I've found no other thread with this solution wouldn't it be better to leave this up so that somebody else might solve a similar problem to mine sooner? –  TotalJargon Jul 31 '12 at 14:03
    
@TotalJargon it is OK, but I did tell you how to define counter as a data member. Just leave this thread as is, no reason to remove. –  juanchopanza Jul 31 '12 at 14:15

Test::Test() : counter(0){} - you should initialize your member variables here, not call member functions.

I guess you meant:

class Test
{
public:
    Test();
    virtual ~Test();
    void count();
    int counter; // no ()
};

As Yuri suggested

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