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I have a class library containing a number of classes, and in each class I raise a number of events.

Each event has its own set of event arguments, so I store these as automatic properties in classes inheriting from EventArgs. I can then raise the relevant event by simply calling Invoke and passing in a new instance of my EventArgs inherited class. This is what I mean:

using System;

//My Class Library
namespace MyClassLibrary
{
    //A class
    public class MyClass
    {
        //My event is a field
        public event EventHandler<MyEventHandler> myEvent;

        //I raise my event in this method
        public void InvokeMyEvent()
        {
            //Do some stuff

            //I raise my event here
            myEvent.Invoke(this, new MyEventHandler("The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog"));

            //Do some more stuff
        }
    }

    //An event handler, containing some interesting data about the event
    public class MyEventHandler : EventArgs
    {
        //Some interesting data as an automatic property
        public string MyInterestingData { get; private set; }

        //I assign the value of my intersting data in my constructor
        public MyEventHandler(string FooBar)
        {
            MyInterestingData = FooBar;
        }
    }
}

So this is what I want to do. Now, in my application, I can add a reference to my class library, instantiate MyClass and subscribe to my event like so. The great thing about this (using a generic event handler) is that Intellisense allows me to use the Tab key when subscribing to my event, and sets up the method for me, passing in MyEventHandler as default. No casting neccessary.

using System;
using MyClassLibrary;

namespace ConsoleApplication33
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            MyClass x = new MyClass();
            x.myEvent += new EventHandler<MyEventHandler>(x_myEvent);
        }

        static void x_myEvent(object sender, MyEventHandler e)
        {
            //Doing lots of important stuff

            //Able to access my interesting data in my event handler without casting
            var y = e.MyInterestingData;
        }
    }
}

This all compiles fine, but the point of a class library is surely to have a bank of re-usable code, which is certainly the intention here. So I want to add my class library to a number of projects. In some of these projects, It will be neccessary for my to subscribe to myEvent, in others it won't, but I still want to use other features of the class in these projects, and have the option to subscribe to myEvent in the future.

However, if I am using my class library in a project in which I don't subscribe to myEvent, I get a Runtime error whenever myEvent is raised.

I have gotten around this by subscribing to myEvent in the constructor of MyClass with an empty method like so:

public MyClass()
{
    myEvent += new EventHandler<MyEventHandler>(MyClass_myEvent);
}


void MyClass_myEvent(object sender, MyEventHandler e)
{

}

This means that I can add my class library to any project, instantiate MyClass and use away at the other functionality it provides, and subscribe to myEvent if I need to, while ignoring myEvent if I don't.

The problem with this is that I have an empty method in MyClass. Imagine this scenario but with about 30 events, and therefore 30 empty methods.

A couple of questions

  1. Am I making sense? As in do you at least understand what I am trying to do, even if you think I am going about this all wrong?
  2. Is there actually a problem here, or is this a fairly standard way of going about achieving the functionality I am trying to achieve?

Thanks

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7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is usually why you see the following pattern with events:

private void OnMyEvent(object sender, MyEventArgs args)
{
    var ev = myEvent;

    if (ev != null)
        ev(sender, args);
}

OnMyEvent(this, new MyEventArgs("The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog"));

The event will be null if it has no subscribers. This code takes a local copy to ensure that the event at point of check is not involved in a race condition. The copy is then invoked. Even though this guards against a race condition in one form, the original subscriber list could still undergo changes, which won't be visible in your copy, so it isn't entirely thread-safe.

To be honest, I've never considered, or even seen, doing it the way you have. I say it's best to stick with the null check as opposed to an empty method subscriber, people expect the former, not the latter.

Also, the empty method route costs memory / objects where the null route only costs a check.

Just as an aside, the MyEventHandler arguments class is usually called something like MyEventArgs.

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2  
This is why I love this website! Thankyou! –  JMK Jul 31 '12 at 15:41

A typical implementation for a event MyEvent is as follows:

protected virtual void OnMyEvent(MyEventArgs eventArgs) {
    var handler = MyEvent;
    if (handler != null) {
        handler(this, eventArgs);
    }
}

Then whenever you want to trigger the event, you call OnMyEvent instead of MyEvent.

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It's worth noting that while multicast delegates can be used for events with any number of subscribers, the performance of Delegate.Combine is optimized for the case where the result will equal one of the passed in delegates, the performance of Delegate.Remove is optimized for the case where the result will be null, and Delegate.Invoke is optimized for the case where it invokes exactly one delegate (and an OnMyEvent which does a null check will be even faster in the case where there are no delegates). Adding an empty event handler will thus make code less efficient than it would otherwise be.

An approach not yet mentioned would be to create a static do-nothing delegate, and then change one's add/remove handlers as appropriate: when adding a subscription, if the old subscription-list delegate matches the static do-nothing delegate, the use Interlocked.CompareExchange to store the new delegate; otherwise compute Delegate.Combine to build a new delegate and CompareExchange that (in either case, if the CompareExchange fails, retry the add-subscription method). When removing a subscription, use Delegate.Remove to figure a new list; if null, substitute the static do-nothing delegate. Then use CompareExchange to update the subscription-list delegate.

That approach would slightly slow down the Add and Remove methods, though not as much as simply leaving the do-nothing delegate in the list; delegate invocation in the zero-subscribers case would be slightly slower than a null check would be, but the single-subscriber case would be slightly faster.

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Waow interesting take on it, thankyou. I've since changed jobs so I don't have access to the code anymore, but I will keep this in mind for future. Thanks –  JMK Dec 10 '12 at 20:01

The canonical way to handle this is to not raise events that have no subscribers:

var handler = myEvent;
if (handler != null)
{
    handler(sender, new MyEventArgs());
}

Assigning to the intermediate handler variable avoids getting an exception if in a multithreaded scenario a single subscriber unsubscribes between the null check and the invocation.

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Usual practise is to check for null before raising the event. In your case:

if (myEvent != null)
  myEvent.Invoke(this, new MyEventHandler("The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog")); 
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There is nothing wrong with initializing an event with an empty handler. I do it all the time. If you are calling the event thousands of times, it might be slower than you want (test, measure, decide)...

You don't have to be so wordy when setting the empty handler, you could do this:

myEvent = (sender, args) => { };

and avoid creating a method...

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I hope I see what you're getting at. I think, you can spare yourself the work for the empty methods. Just invoke your events in the following way:

 //I raise my event in this method
    public void InvokeMyEvent()
    {
        //Do some stuff

        //Check if there are subscribers!!
        if (myEvent != null)
          myEvent.Invoke(this, new MyEventHandler("The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog"));

        //Do some more stuff
    }
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