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I want to merge two Ruby modules without breaking the lookup chain. Basically I want the behavior of BothAnB to be exactly as if I concatenated the textual source code from A and B and the new foo replaces the old. The problem occurs when MRO linearizes an inheritance diamond.

module O
  def foo; puts "O" end
end

module A
  include O
  def foo; puts "A"; super end
  def aaa; puts "aaa" end
end

module B
  include O
  def foo; puts "B"; super end
  def bbb; puts "bbb" end
end

module BothAnB
  #insert magic here such that a class C that includes BothAnB:
  # C.new.foo => B O
  # C.new.aaa => aaa
  # C.new.bbb => bbb
end

module JustA
  #insert magic here such that a class C that includes JustA:
  # C.new.foo => A O
  # C.new.aaa => aaa
  # C.new.bbb => FAIL
end
#and similarly JustB

A and B are fairly complex modules that can have deep inheritance chains (this is for a meta-programming framework that allows programmers to do just that).

Include B, A doesn't work because instead of the lookup BothAnB->B->A->O, I need it to be BothAnB->B->O(and optionally ->A). I've gotten close by:

  • deep cloning entire inheritance tree of A (to remove diamond)
  • undef_method on the A's clone to remove methods found in B
  • making a new method for Module to reflect this behavior

Is there a better solution than this? I would ideally want to keep at least some of the modules recognizable when calling BothAnB.ancestors.

[Note: I completely changed the question after getting two answers based on Phrogz's feedback, so if they seem irrelevant they are]

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1  
Why do you want to do this? This smells like an XY problem. As written, what you are wanting to do sounds like a bad idea. –  Phrogz Jul 31 '12 at 15:47
    
I'm building a meta-programming framework so logic goes out the window. :( The actual code doesn't look (or work) anything like this –  alexloh Jul 31 '12 at 21:05
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

Here's another possible trick:

module BothAnB
  include A
  include O.clone
  include B
end

class C
  include BothAnB
end

C.new.foo
C.new.aaa
C.new.bbb

# output:
B
O
aaa
bbb

Here we make super in B#foo to point at O#foo instead of A#foo.

If O is complex and includes other stuff, it may require more of such magic:

module O
  # don't do this:
  # include Whatever

  # do this instead:
  def self.included(base)
    base.send(:include, Whatever.clone)
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
OK. This is not my ideal solution but it's sugar for cloning and I guess as close as I'm going to get. Do I need to put the line include Whatever? And when is the callback included called? I tried a few times (according to manual) but failed –  alexloh Aug 21 '12 at 7:25
    
When doing some tricky metaprogramming or internal DSLs, it's quite common to hit walls which make you use fragile nuances of host language. Sometimes ideal solution is not to have problem in the first place. But if reconsidering design constraints is not feasible, you end up with choice between more or less evil approaches. My approach is one of those evil ones. And ideal solution, I think, would rely on some explicit language construct. –  Serge Balyuk Aug 21 '12 at 8:30
    
Back to practical side: no, you don't need to put include Whatever, I've updated answer for clarity. For hints on callback please see this gist.github.com/3413487 –  Serge Balyuk Aug 21 '12 at 8:30
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Would this solve it for you?

module M1
  def foo; 42; end
  def bar; 17; end
end

class Base
  def foo; 0; end
end

require 'remix' # gem install remix 
class X < Base
  include_after Base, M1
end

p X.new.foo, #=> 0
  X.new.bar  #=> 17
share|improve this answer
    
Yes this looks exactly like what I need! But it doesn't seem to work for Ruby 1.9 –  alexloh Aug 1 '12 at 11:42
    
@alexloh I ran that above code on Ruby 1.9.3 on Windows. What exact Ruby version and OS did you try it on, and what error(s) did you get? To be sure: did you install the remix gem? –  Phrogz Aug 1 '12 at 12:53
    
I was unable to install the gem. "ERROR: Failed to build gem native extension" I'm using Ruby 1.9.3 on Ubuntu –  alexloh Aug 2 '12 at 11:58
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M1parent.send(:remove_method, :foo)

You must remote it from M1parent because that's where it's defined, M1.send(:remove_method, :foo) for example, would not work because the method foo is defined on M1parent.

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Any alternative to that? M1 is pretty complicated (lots of included modules that include other modules) just because of what it does. Plus its parents are shared, so I cannot just remove it there directly –  alexloh Jul 31 '12 at 20:55
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My suggestion is as follows: Log into http://bugs.ruby-lang.org/ and submit a feature request, or, if you are more confident, a bug request. Because this is basically a problem of Ruby. Current Ruby behavior is unexpected without prior experience and thus should be change to the expected behavior: So that you can get what you need by simply calling

module BothAnB
  include A
  include B
end

Workarounds are surely possible, as you noted yourself. But the Ruby behavior in this imho is not correct.

So until then, you'll have to refrain from calling super and I'd suggest instead playing with

O.instance_method( :foo )

and calling it from B and A modules instead of convenience keyword super:

module A
  include O
  def foo
    puts "A"
    O.instance_method( :foo ).bind( self ).call
  end
end

# do same for B and it'll work
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure if this should be considered a bug. Linearization forces O to be before A otherwise X breaks when foo is not defined in B. I'm sure this is not a design decision they made easily and other languages, notably Scala traits, have different mixin semantics while Python afaik is the same as Ruby. But yes I agree it was unexpected. –  alexloh Aug 14 '12 at 11:08
    
Thanks for enlightening comment. –  Boris Stitnicky Aug 14 '12 at 14:31
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