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The HTML5 documentation recommends putting the code element inside the pre element, but I don't understand how this is better or more semantic than just using the code element and CSS. In their own example:

<pre><code class="language-pascal">var i: Integer;
begin
   i := 1;
end.</code></pre>

Could also be written (Making some assumptions about the browser's defaults for pre):

<style>
code {
    display: block;
    white-space: pre;
}
</style>
…
<code class="language-pascal">var i: Integer;
begin
   i := 1;
end.</code>

Even if the pre is there to distinguish a code block from an inline string of code, I don't see it being a more semantic choice than specifying the block-ness of the code in a class.

Is there a specific reason the pre is recommended over a CSS solution?

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3  
because <code> while does apply a fixed-width font, it does not apply any line-break honoring as <pre> will. e.g. applying <code> to formatted code will break the formatting. This is somewhat of an oversight in the original definition of <code>, and now we're stuck with it for backwards compatibility. –  Marc B Jul 31 '12 at 14:55
3  
The documentation don't "recommend" it, it just shows it as an example. "[the example] shows how a block of code could be marked up using the pre and code elements." –  Rocket Hazmat Jul 31 '12 at 14:57
1  
@MarcB I don't think it's an oversight. As I said in my question, code is also useful for inline code strings. But that doesn't make pre a better solution than CSS for block formatting. –  kojiro Jul 31 '12 at 14:57
4  
Don't you mean white-space: pre; in the css snippet? –  xec Jul 31 '12 at 15:03
2  
@kojiro deep breaths, think of a calm blue ocean. also, add a dash to white-space? :) –  xec Jul 31 '12 at 15:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 36 down vote accepted

<code> represents only a "fragment of computer code". It was originally thought for simple code snippets like i++ or <code>.

<pre> "represents a block of preformatted text, in which structure is represented by typographic conventions rather than by elements". It's original purpose was nothing more than exactly this: provide a text in the same way it was given by the author, e.g.

+----------------------------------+
|                                  |
| WARNING! PREFORMATED TEXT AHEAD! |                      =o=
|                               __;                                  ~^
+----------------TT------------°
                 ||    _____________    _____________________
                 ||    | TO GRANDMA  >  | TOTALLY NOT A TRAP  > 
  oÖo            ||    |°°°°°°°°°°°°    °°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°          
   |  ö          ||    |                |      .mm,                    
~"""~"""~"""~"""~"""~"""~~"""~"""~"""~"""~"""~"""~"""~"""~"""~""..MWMWc...~"""~""

You don't need to use each with each other. <pre> has its own roles, like <code> has its own. However, <pre> is a way to signalize that the white-space in the given fragment is important, a role that <code> is missing.

However, back to your question: note the exact wording:

The following example shows how a block of code could be marked up using the pre and code elements.

<pre><code class="language-pascal">var i: Integer;
begin
   i := 1;
end.</code></pre>

A class is used in that example to indicate the language used.

It says could, not should. You're free to do this how you want. It's not recommended by the W3C in any way, however, I personally recommend you to use <pre><code>....

Further explanation

Whenever white-space is part of your code and the structure of your code, you should state that this structure should be kept. As the structure in code is given by typographic conventions (tabs, linefeeds, spaces) I personally recommend you to use <pre><code>, even if it's arguably more code and another node in the DOM. But whenever missing white-space will render your code imperfect it's necessary.

Apart from that you can easily differ between inline code and code-blocks without checking element.className, and some JS syntax highlighter work pretty well with <pre><code>... and strip the <code> automatically.

Also, if you use a general rule for <code> with white-space:pre;, you cannot use it for inline snippets without additional classes. If you were to create a class instead, you've won nothing compared to <pre><code>.

References

  • W3C: HTML5: 4.6.11 The code element (WD-html5-20120329)

    The code element represents a fragment of computer code. This could be an XML element name, a filename, a computer program, or any other string that a computer would recognize.

  • W3C: HTML5: 4.5.3 The pre element (WD-html5-20120329)

    The pre element represents a block of preformatted text, in which structure is represented by typographic conventions rather than by elements.

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This is a well-thought-out answer, but I'll pose the same followup I posed for Quentin: So then I should use pre for code with significant whitespace, and CSS for code where the whitespace is presentational? –  kojiro Jul 31 '12 at 15:15
2  
Whenever white-space is part of your code and the structure of your code, you should state that this structure should be kept. As the structure in code is given by typographic conventions (tabs, linefeeds, spaces) I personally recommend you to use <pre><code>, even if it's arguably more code and another node in the DOM. (Apart from that you can easily differ between inline code and blocks, and some JS syntax highlighter work only on <pre><code>... and strip the <code> automatically). –  Zeta Jul 31 '12 at 15:24
2  
+1 If your goal is semantic markup, i agree with Zeta's recommendation, seeing as <pre> means preformatted and <code> means code fragment, when what you are marking up is preformatted code, using <pre><code> makes sense. If your goal is clean markup, I would go with the css white-space: pre; solution. –  xec Jul 31 '12 at 15:28

CSS is for presentation.

White space is significant (not presentational) in many programming languages.

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2  
It should also be noted that even in programming languages that white space isn't required for (technically speaking), it is necessary in order for humans to read it easily. –  bfrohs Jul 31 '12 at 15:00
2  
@FabianBarney, umm... yeah, I know. That's what I said "...even in programming languages that white space isn't required for...". I never said white space wasn't technically required for any programming languages. –  bfrohs Jul 31 '12 at 15:03
    
@bfrohs Oh sry, I misunderstood you in the first place. +1 –  Fabian Barney Jul 31 '12 at 15:06
1  
So then I should use pre tags for code with significant whitespace, and CSS for code where the whitespace is presentational? –  kojiro Jul 31 '12 at 15:07
2  
This answer makes me wonder whether <pre> is semantic markup at all, or rather like <b>, <i> (i.e., a purely representational left-over of early HTML versions). –  stakx Aug 4 '12 at 8:52

To represent a block of computer code, the pre element can be used with a code element;

To represent a block of computer output the pre element can be used with a samp element.

<pre><code> for block code that must not wrap. Use <code> for inline code that can wrap.

Line breaks and white spaces in the text enclosed within the <pre> tags is maintained as it is in the html document when displays on the browser.Browsers normally render <pre> text in a fixed-pitched font, with whitespace.

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This doesn't really answer the OPs question, which was "why the <pre> in the html5 example?" –  xec Jul 31 '12 at 15:06
    
he asked "Is there a specific reason the pre is recommended over a CSS solution?" In my knowledge i answered. –  prash Jul 31 '12 at 15:17

<pre> shows line breaks!

This prevent you using php function such as nl2br() or adding manually <br /> at every line end.

Regards, Ghost

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