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Is there a way to throw an exception when a user tries to use a non thread-safe method of a class in a multithreaded context? I guess the issue is mostly to detect that multiple threads are trying to use the method. Or, is there a "not_synchronous" keyword/tag I could use on the function declaration?

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2  
For about the same amount of work, you could probably make the method thread-safe. –  Alex Jul 31 '12 at 16:07
    
@Alex For probably less work ;-) –  assylias Jul 31 '12 at 16:07
    
Why not make that method thread-safe if you are really worried about multi-thread access? –  Nambari Jul 31 '12 at 16:08
    
declare it as synchronized for starters? ;) –  Shark Jul 31 '12 at 16:11
    
It's a given that we have Java core library classes that are not thread-safe by design, so Frank's question is of interest. That said, as all have pointed out - you may loose the performance advantage by making the check. You can be safe(r), or you can be fast(er), but you can't have it all. –  Richard Sitze Jul 31 '12 at 16:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is no easy way to do this, no. If you are detecting that multiple threads are using a method, then chances are you will have to be using thread-safe collections and the like. If you are doing all that then you might as well have to make the method itself thread-safe.

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An alternative (possibly weak) option is the strategy used by the standard collections' iterators. –  assylias Jul 31 '12 at 16:08
1  
Interesting idea but there's no guarantee that it would work however @assylias. No guarantee that you would hit the race. –  Gray Jul 31 '12 at 16:09

Actually, if your goal is to determine that "multiple threads are trying to use this method," and you're not constraining that to "multiple methods... at the same time" - then (forgive me) Alex's code can be adapted nicely:

  1. Change methodBeingUsed to threadOwningMethod, and set it to the thread instead of true.

  2. You don't need to clear it at the end - save those lock/unlock steps. Once it's owned, it's owned (capitalist pig!!).

  3. threadOwningMethod can be checked up-front to see if it matches the current thread (A-OK) or not (throw exception) without having to incur the lock. If it's not set (null), then you incur a one-time hit: check/lock/check&set/unlock; this is safe because threadOwningMethod is marked volatile.

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From Frank's last comment, this probably isn't what he's looking for. –  Richard Sitze Jul 31 '12 at 16:45

To expand on Gray's answer: suppose you wanted to do this (detect when a method is being used by multiple threads). A naive (and incorrect) implementation of this might look like:

volatile boolean methodBeingUsed = false;
public void doSomething() {
  if (methodBeingUsed) throw new IllegalStateException("You can't do that!");
  try {
    methodBeingUsed = true;
    // do something...
  } finally {
    methodBeingUsed = false;
  }
}

Well, OK... but two threads could both get past the first if (methodBeingUsed) check and enter the critical section at the same time. So now maybe we try adding a lock to protect the methodBeingUsed flag:

Lock methodLock = new ReentrantLock();
volatile boolean methodBeingUsed = false;
public void doSomething() {
  try {
    lock.lock();
    if (methodBeingUsed) throw new IllegalStateException("You can't do that!");
    methodBeingUsed = true;
  } finally {
    lock.unlock();
  }

  try {
    // do something...
  } finally {
    try {
      lock.lock();
      methodBeingUsed = false;
    } finally {
      lock.unlock();
    }
  }
}

Of course, this assumes that doSomething() can't recursively call itself. If it can, then you also have to keep track of the calling thread. Add in some more checks to account for other conditions that I'm not thinking of right now, and it's easy to see that the effort spent synchronizing the logic to detect the method being used by multiple threads would be better spent just making the method thread-safe to begin with.

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You could check whether the method is already in use before allowing a thread to run it - but that is not very different from using a lock (note: my example is not reentrant):

private static final AtomicBoolean used = new AtomicBoolean();

public static void unsafe() throws InterruptedException {
    if(!used.compareAndSet(false, true)) {
        throw new IllegalStateException();
    }
    //do you stuff
    used.set(false);
}
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Much saner than my example :) –  Alex Jul 31 '12 at 16:24

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