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So I'm writing a C# application using Compact Framework 2.0 and I wanted to know if I could do something more simply than I have planned out in my head.
If there are answers to other frameworks, full or compact, but not for this one, I'd still like to hear them, which is why the tags do not include compact framework 2.0 at this point in time.

Effectively, the user will be able to choose that an item they want to set settings for is of type A or type B, then what specific setting they want to use/set under that classification. I want to use enumerations to, mostly, keep code legible, as this is for my workplace and people should be able to read it if I'm not around.

What I have in mind:
The following would be global to application, not in a specific class:

enum EnumTypes
{
    A, B,
    Num_Types,
}
enum EnumA
{
    Setting1 = 0, Setting2, Setting3, //and so on...
    Num_A_Settings, //WILL be different from B
}
enum EnumB
{
    Setting1 = 0, Setting2, Setting3, //and so on...
    Num_B_Settings, //WILL be different from A
}

The following is an example of functions/properties the class that would use the values to do their work, obviously exposing only what other classes will need.

public class SettingClass
{
    public EnumTypes TypeUsed {/*basic get/set for property*/}
    public int SelectedSettingIndex {/*basic get/set for property*/}
    private ClassX[][] _settingsData = new ClassX[(int)Num_Types][];

    public SettingClass()
    {
        for(int i = 0; i < (int)EnumTypes.Num_Types;i++)
        {
            if((EnumTypes)i == EnumTypes.A)
            {
                _settingsData[i] = new ClassX[(int)EnumA.Num_A_Settings];
                //for loop for initializing each ClassX instance for A
            }
            else if((EnumTypes)i == EnumTypes.B)
            {
                _settingsData[i] = new ClassX[(int)EnumB.Num_B_Settings];
                //for loop for initializing each ClassX instance for B
            }
    }

    //just an example
    public IncrementSetting()
    {
        if(TypeUsed == EnumTypes.A)
        { /*range checking using Num_A_Settings, increments SelectedSettingIndex*/ }
        else if(TypeUsed == EnumTypes.B)
        { /*range checking using Num_B_Settings, increments SelectedSettingIndex*/ }
    }
}

Please don't get too bogged down in the details of what each class/variable has and how it's initialized and whatnot, as this is a quick writeup of an idea to try to represent what I'm asking about. I didn't copy/paste this from my code.

Is there a way to, instead of exposing only an int for "settingIndex," I could expose an enumeration and show EnumA or EnumB values to whatever uses this class?

Right now, anything that had to get the selected setting index would have to basically say "What type, A or B? It's A, okay, so that int actually means the value from A, NOT from B, caste the int to EnumA..." or similar, which can get complex quickly OUTSIDE of this class that's intended to encapsulate all the work.

I was thinking on if there was some sort of inheritance I could do or similar, but I doubt there is.

share|improve this question
    
Do the users (programmers) decide wether they want to work with EnumA or EnumB during they write code or is it a runtime decision? –  achitaka-san Jul 31 '12 at 16:29
    
Not sure I can answer that properly... This isn't the use of it but it's a good analogy: imagine a menu page saying "which menu do you want to look over, menu A or menu B?" followed by the menu chosen (seeing the settings in the particular menu). The user (i.e. operator, not programmer) can always go back and say "Okay, now let's look at menu B" and then be shown the settings for menu B. Again, this is an analogy, I'm not sure I'd be allowed to use specifics. –  Peter Lacerenza Jul 31 '12 at 17:25
    
Another good analogy, possibly more accurate, would be listing of German cars or a listing of Japanese cars, and saying at the top "Do you want German or Japanese cars?" before showing the listing of them, and using the enumeration of the two types as an index to get data on each type of car, i.e. carData[(int)CarSource.Japanese][(int)GermanCars.ToyotaCarolla].VehicleHeight. –  Peter Lacerenza Jul 31 '12 at 17:31

2 Answers 2

Instead of an array, you could use a Dictionary<Enum,ClassX>. Then as long as you use Enum instead of int wherever you're using your enums, you'll have full type information around and can tell individual enum values apart.

A C# enum has the interesting property that it can act like an int everywhere you need it for performance reasons, but it's happy to be a fully-fledged object when you need to have type information attached to its value.

Some LINQPad code I just used to test all of this:

void Main()
{
  Dictionary<Enum,object> dict = new Dictionary<Enum,object>();
  dict.Add(asdf.lkj,null);
  dict.Add(qwer.oiu,null);
  Console.WriteLine(dict.ContainsKey(qwer.oiu));
  Console.WriteLine(dict.ContainsKey(asdf.lkj));
  Console.WriteLine(dict.ContainsKey(qwer.zxcv));
}

enum asdf {
  lkj
}

enum qwer {
  oiu,
  zxcv
}

and its output

True
True
False
share|improve this answer

The following example wraps and unwraps an enum value via reflection, is it close to what you're looking for ?

namespace App
{
  class Program
  {
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
      var val = new EnumWrapper(B.f);
      Enum en = val.EnumVal;
      Console.WriteLine("{0}.{1}",en.GetType().Name,en);
    }
  }
  enum EnumType { A, B }
  enum A { a, b, c = 34, d = 12 }
  enum B { a, b, e = 54, f = 56 }
  class EnumWrapper
  {
    public EnumWrapper(Enum i)
    {
      type = (EnumType) Enum.Parse( typeof(EnumType), i.GetType().Name );
      index = Convert.ToInt32(i);
    }
    public EnumType type;
    public int index;
    public Enum EnumVal {
      get {
        Enum c = (Enum)Enum.ToObject(
          Type.GetType(
            "App." + type
          ), index
        );
        return c;
      }
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer

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