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I'm trying to count trailing zeros of numbers that are resulted from factorials (meaning that the numbers get quite large). Following code takes a number, compute the factorial of the number, and count the trailing zeros. However, when the number is about as large as 25!, numZeros don't work.

public static void main(String[] args) {
    BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
    double fact;
    int answer;

    try {
        int number = Integer.parseInt(br.readLine());
        fact = factorial(number);
        answer = numZeros(fact);
    }
    catch (NumberFormatException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

public static double factorial (int num) {
    double total = 1;
    for (int i = 1; i <= num; i++) {
        total *= i;
    }
    return total;
}   

public static int numZeros (double num) {
    int count = 0;
    int last = 0;   

    while (last == 0) {
        last = (int) (num % 10);
        num = num / 10;
        count++;
    }

    return count-1;
}

I am not worrying about the efficiency of this code, and I know that there are multiple ways to make the efficiency of this code BETTER. What I'm trying to figure out is why the counting trailing zeros of numbers that are greater than 25! is not working.

Any ideas?

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1  
my guess is because you are surpassing the size of a double. –  jjnguy Jul 23 '09 at 21:15
    
@jjnguy: Yea, that was my first guess, but then 25! is less than Java's max double. –  codingbear Jul 23 '09 at 21:19
    
By the way, numZeros will return -1 for 1!, 2!, 3!, and 4!. –  Michael Myers Jul 23 '09 at 21:21
    
My guess is that because of floating-point errors, you're getting 9.999999999's when you expect 10's. I'm only surprised that it works for so long. –  Michael Myers Jul 23 '09 at 21:33
    
Admit it, you were trying to solve this: spoj.pl/problems/FCTRL. >:D –  andandandand Aug 5 '11 at 17:43

7 Answers 7

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Your task is not to compute the factorial but the number of zeroes. A good solution uses the formula from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trailing_zeros (which you can try to prove)

def zeroes(n):
    i = 1
    result = 0
    while n >= i:
        i *= 5
        result += n/i  # (taking floor, just like Python or Java does)
    return result

Hope you can translate this to Java. This simply computes [n / 5] + [n / 25] + [n / 125] + [n / 625] + ... and stops when the divisor gets larger than n.

DON'T use BigIntegers. This is a bozosort. Such solutions require seconds of time for large numbers.

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You only really need to know how many 2s and 5s there are in the product. If you're counting trailing zeroes, then you're actually counting "How many times does ten divide this number?". if you represent n! as q*(2^a)*(5^b) where q is not divisible by 2 or 5. Then just taking the minimum of a and b in the second expression will give you how many times 10 divides the number. Actually doing the multiplication is overkill.

Edit: Counting the twos is also overkill, so you only really need the fives.

And for some python, I think this should work:

def countFives(n):
    fives = 0	
    m = 5
    while m <= n:
    	fives = fives + (n/m)
    	m = m*5
    return fives
share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand what you mean by count how many 2s and 5s are there in the product. –  codingbear Jul 23 '09 at 21:20
    
@bLee: The only way to get a trailing 0 is to multiply a number divisible by 2 with a number divisible by 5. Every pair of 2 and 5 gives you another trailing 0. –  Michael Myers Jul 23 '09 at 21:23
    
2's and 5's are the only two prime factors of 10. Since you want to know the numbers of zeros, you care about whether or not your number is divisible by 10. If you know how many 2's and 5's go into your final number, you know how many times it's divisible by 10. –  Paul McMillan Jul 23 '09 at 21:24
    
You are looking for the number of factors of 10 that occur in the expansion of 25! ; this can be found by determining the number of 2s and 5s in the expanded product. At least that's my understanding. The problem you'll run into if you don't follow this method is that you'll lose enough precision using a floating point number that you'll get the wrong answer. –  CoderTao Jul 23 '09 at 21:25
3  
why are you counting the 2's anyways? you know the limiting factor is the 5's –  Jimmy Jul 23 '09 at 22:01

The double type has limited precision, so if the numbers you are working with get too big the double will be only an approximation. To work around this you can use something like BigInteger to make it work for arbitrarily large integers.

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You can use a DecimalFormat to format big numbers. If you format your number this way you get the number in scientific notation then every number will be like 1.4567E7 this will make your work much easier. Because the number after the E - the number of characters behind the . are the number of trailing zeros I think.

I don't know if this is the exact pattern needed. You can see how to form the patterns here

DecimalFormat formater = new DecimalFormat("0.###E0");
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Java's doubles max out at a bit over 9 * 10 ^ 18 where as 25! is 1.5 * 10 ^ 25. If you want to be able to have factorials that high you might want to use BigInteger (similar to BigDecimal but doesn't do decimals).

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1  
You might be confusing double with long. double maxes out at somewhere around 1.8 * 10^308, but its precision isn't too good by that point. –  Michael Myers Jul 23 '09 at 21:31

I wrote this up real quick, I think it solves your problem accurately. I used the BigInteger class to avoid that cast from double to integer, which could be causing you problems. I tested it on several large numbers over 25, such as 101, which accurately returned 24 zeros.

The idea behind the method is that if you take 25! then the first calculation is 25 * 24 = 600, so you can knock two zeros off immediately and then do 6 * 23 = 138. So it calculates the factorial removing zeros as it goes.

public static int count(int number) {
	final BigInteger zero = new BigInteger("0");
	final BigInteger ten = new BigInteger("10");
	int zeroCount = 0;
	BigInteger mult = new BigInteger("1");
	while (number > 0) {
		mult = mult.multiply(new BigInteger(Integer.toString(number)));
		while (mult.mod(ten).compareTo(zero) == 0){
			mult = mult.divide(ten);
			zeroCount += 1;
		}
		number -= 1;
	}
	return zeroCount;
}

Since you said you don't care about run time at all (not that my first was particularly efficient, just slightly more so) this one just does the factorial and then counts the zeros, so it's cenceptually simpler:

public static BigInteger factorial(int number) {
	BigInteger ans = new BigInteger("1");
	while (number > 0) {
		ans = ans.multiply(new BigInteger(Integer.toString(number)));
		number -= 1;
	}
	return ans;
}

public static int countZeros(int number) {
	final BigInteger zero = new BigInteger("0");
	final BigInteger ten = new BigInteger("10");
	BigInteger fact = factorial(number);
	int zeroCount = 0;
	while (fact.mod(ten).compareTo(zero) == 0){
		fact = fact.divide(ten);
		zeroCount += 1;
	}
}
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My 2 cents: avoid to work with double since they are error-prone. A better datatype in this case is BigInteger, and here there is a small method that will help you:

public class CountTrailingZeroes {

    public int countTrailingZeroes(double number) {
        return countTrailingZeroes(String.format("%.0f", number));
    }

    public int countTrailingZeroes(String number) {
        int c = 0;
        int i = number.length() - 1;

        while (number.charAt(i) == '0') {
            i--;
            c++;
        }

        return c;

    }

    @Test
    public void $128() {
        assertEquals(0, countTrailingZeroes("128"));
    }

    @Test
    public void $120() {
        assertEquals(1, countTrailingZeroes("120"));
    }

    @Test
    public void $1200() {
        assertEquals(2, countTrailingZeroes("1200"));
    }

    @Test
    public void $12000() {
        assertEquals(3, countTrailingZeroes("12000"));
    }

    @Test
    public void $120000() {
        assertEquals(4, countTrailingZeroes("120000"));
    }

    @Test
    public void $102350000() {
        assertEquals(4, countTrailingZeroes("102350000"));
    }

    @Test
    public void $1023500000() {
        assertEquals(5, countTrailingZeroes(1023500000.0));
    }
}
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1  
Aren't you still relying on a float/double? format("%.0f" –  frogstarr78 Nov 15 '10 at 0:30

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