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I haven't seen this exact question here, which surprises me.

The following will not compile:

public int compareTo( Object o )
{
    if ( this.order < ((Category o).order) )
    {
      return -1;
    }
    else if ( this.order > ((Category o).order) ) 
    {
        return 1;
    }
    else
    {
        return 0;
    }
}

Whereas changing this to cast the object and store its reference in a new object outside of the conditional statement fixes the issue:

Category cat = ( Category )o;
if ( this.order < cat.order )
// Etc...

My question is, why is this behavior not allowed in Java? (Java 5 specifically)

EDIT: Aha! Thank you all. Darn modern IDEs giving vague error messages. I've begun to discount them, which didn't do me any good this time. (Netbeans was warning me about both a missing parenthesis and a missing semicolon...)

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if ( this.order < ((Category) o ).order) –  Joel Jul 31 '12 at 17:02
    
There is a missing parenthesis. –  EJP Jul 31 '12 at 23:23
    
@EJP Right, but there isn't a missing semicolon. That was evidence both that I should have paid attention to it, but also that those messages can be wonky. –  BlackVegetable Aug 1 '12 at 14:13

6 Answers 6

up vote 16 down vote accepted

The problem here is that your syntax is not right. It should be

public int compareTo( Object o )
{
    if ( this.order < ((Category) o).order )
    {
      return -1;
    }
    else if ( this.order > ((Category) o).order ) 
    {
        return 1;
    }
    else
    {
        return 0;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Have a look at simple working demo of casting within if :

int i;
float d = 10.5f;
if((i = (int) d) == 10){
//works
}

in your code problem is with if ( this.order < ((Category o).order) ) its incorrect statement

it should be if ( this.order < ((Category) o).order)

EDIT : Your problem solved but one thing more(extra topping), no need to have else(ladder form) as you are having return within if

public int compareTo( Object o )
{
    if ( this.order < ((Category) o).order )
    {
        return -1;
    }
    if ( this.order > ((Category) o).order ) 
    {
        return 1;
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
@BlackVegetable one thing more there is no need to have else as you are having return within if –  Harmeet Singh Aug 1 '12 at 2:28

I prefer the syntax

Category.class.cast(o)

then you are explicit in what you are doing and it avoids any confusion with brackets. From my understanding the above is the same as ((Category) o)

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Aha! Can anyone else verify this is correct? I really like this syntax! –  BlackVegetable Jul 31 '12 at 17:13
3  
Well, they definitely compile down to different code. Both include a checkcast, but the Category.class.cast(o) method also pushes the Category.class to the stack and then has an invokevirtual. In other words, the .class approach has everything the cast approach has, plus some. How much of a performance impact this would have, I don't know (I would guess negligible). pastebin.com/7VRtfX5j –  yshavit Jul 31 '12 at 17:22

There is a distinct difference between the two code snippets you posted:

(Category o)

is different than:

( Category )o

This first will not compile, the second one will.

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I think you need this:

(((Category) o).order)

I just tried a simpler version of what you have:

int a = 5;
        if(4 < (double)a);

and it compiled fine.

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This should be allowed, it seems as if your parenthesis may be off: have you tried something like

if ( this.order < (((Category)o).order) )

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