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How to get more columns from MAX(ID), MIN(ID) MYSQL query?

Currently I get only two values: MAX(ID) & MIN(ID) from this query:

SELECT MIN(ID), MAX(ID) FROM mytable WHERE mytable.series = 'white' ;

Need to get something like this-pseudo-query:

SELECT  column1, column2
FROM    mytable 
WHERE   series = 'white'
AND ID=Max(ID)
'AND GET ME ALSO'
WHERE   series = 'white'
AND ID=Min(ID);`

It should return 2 rows for the column 'series' that equals 'white'.

1st with column1 and column2 for ID=Min(ID). 2nd with column1 and column2 for ID=Max(ID).

But how?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Here is an approach using UNION:

SELECT column1, column2
FROM mytable
WHERE series = 'white' AND ID IN
(    
    SELECT MIN(ID) FROM mytable WHERE series = 'white'
    UNION
    SELECT MAX(ID) FROM mytable WHERE series = 'white'
)

For good performance add a combined index on (series, id).

Or another variation which may have better performance:

(
    SELECT column1, column2
    FROM mytable
    WHERE series = 'white'
    ORDER BY ID
    LIMIT 1
)
UNION
(
    SELECT column1, column2
    FROM mytable
    WHERE series = 'white'
    ORDER BY ID DESC
    LIMIT 1
)

This will also be able to use the combined index on (series, id).

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This works but takes 1:39 min. for a +5000 rows of data...is that normal? –  Ash501 Jul 31 '12 at 17:19
1  
@Ash501: That is absolutely not normal. Did you forget to add indexes? I've updated my answer to include an index suggestion. But with 5000 rows I think it should be much faster than that even without an index. Is your database server underpowered or under heavily load. Can you update your question to mention that performance is an issue and include the output of SHOW CREATE TABLE ... and the result of EXPLAIN SELECT? –  Mark Byers Jul 31 '12 at 17:20
1  
@Ash501, that's because subqueries are slow as MySQL has to execute them for each row. His second solution should be faster provided you have the correct indexes set up. –  Zane Bien Jul 31 '12 at 17:23
    
@ZaneBien: Saying "subqueries are slow in MySQL" is a generalisation. It is true that there was a bug where subqueries inside IN expressions could be slow in older versions of MySQL and when an index was not present, but: a) it is fixed in the newest MySQL and adding an index (which you should add anyway regardless of the bug) will solve the problem. –  Mark Byers Jul 31 '12 at 17:31
1  
@Ash501: 12 seconds is still ridiculously slow. If it were 12 milliseconds instead of seconds, then it would be about what I'd expect. Regarding your statement "Need to index 'series' - 'id' is already indexed." - this is wrong. You should add a combined index on (series, id). You should add this combined index even if series or id or both are already separately indexed. A combined index is not the same as indexing the columns separately. –  Mark Byers Jul 31 '12 at 17:32

A simpler solution:

SELECT a.column1, a.column2
FROM   mytable a
JOIN   (
       SELECT MIN(ID) AS minid, MAX(ID) AS maxid
       FROM   mytable
       WHERE  series = 'white'
       ) b ON a.ID IN (b.minid, b.maxid)
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It's exactly as you say:

SELECT
  column1, column2
FROM 
  mytable as m, 
  (SELECT MIN(ID) as mid, MAX(ID) as xid 
   FROM mytable WHERE mytable.series = 'white'
   ) t
WHERE 
  m.ID = t.mid or m.ID = t.xid;

The select in parentheses is the inner select that you can use just like another table.

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