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Duplicate:

Why IEnumerable<T> inherits from IEnumerable?


It looks like IEnumerable, ICollection, IList and their generic equivalents are in separate branches.

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marked as duplicate by Jon Skeet, Henk Holterman, Jimmy, Alex Martelli, M4N Jul 23 '09 at 22:08

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why would that be a problem? –  jeroenh Jul 23 '09 at 21:25
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It's a pain in VB.Net, because you have to implement both interfaces with different names. –  Joel Coehoorn Jul 23 '09 at 21:27
    
What do you mean, branches? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 23 '09 at 21:29
    
Just curiosity. –  Joan Venge Jul 23 '09 at 21:41
    
Also by branches I meant, they are like List vs List<T>, are independent of each other. –  Joan Venge Jul 23 '09 at 21:42

1 Answer 1

It does this so that all older methods and code that knows how to handle an IEnumerable is guaranteed to work with your collections.

Implementing IEnumerable<T> implicitly means you implement IEnumerable.

By branches, do you mean namespaces?

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Thanks. By branches I meant, they are like List vs List<T>, are independent of each other. –  Joan Venge Jul 23 '09 at 21:42
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But couldn't they update those old methods to also work with the generic version? –  Joan Venge Jul 23 '09 at 21:43
    
This way old assemblies expecting IEnumerable will work with the IEnumerable<T> class. Sometimes there isn't source code to modify (ie., the new class is part of something that plugs into an existing app at runtime, someone using a library that provides only assemblies, no source). –  Michael Burr Jul 23 '09 at 22:04
    
Nor might it be worth the time to fix already working code like that. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Jul 23 '09 at 22:07

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