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This code is supposed to simplify fractions and convert decimals to fractions but when I put in fractions with larger dividens (numbers more than 7 or 8 digits) it lags a great amount.

http://jsfiddle.net/SuperBoi45/vQjgx/

var fraction = {};

fraction.simplify = function( frac ) {
    if ( frac.indexOf('/') < 0 ) return frac;
    var numbers = frac.split('/'),
        factor = null,
        parsed = null;

    return (function run( nums ) {
        factor = fraction.factor( nums[0], nums[1] );

        if ( factor === 1 ) {
            parsed = [ Math.abs(nums[0]), Math.abs(nums[1]) ];

            if ( nums[1] === 1 ) return nums[0];
            else if ( nums[1] === -1 ) return -nums[0];
            else if ( nums[0] < 0 && nums[1] < 1 ) return parsed[0] + '/' + parsed[1];
            else if ( nums[0] < 0 || nums[1] < 0 ) return '-' + parsed[0] + '/' + parsed[1];
            else return nums[0] + '/' + nums[1];
        }

        return run( [ nums[0] / factor, nums[1] / factor ] );
    })( numbers );
};
fraction.convert = function( decimal ) {
    var j = decimal.length - 1,
        b = "1";

    if ( decimal.indexOf(".") >= 0 && decimal.length > 1 ) {

        while ( decimal.charAt( j ) != "." ) {
            b += "0";
            j--;
        }

        decimal *= b;
        decimal += "/" + b;

    }

    return decimal;

};
fraction.factor = (function() {

    var greater = function( a, b ) {
        return a > b ? a : b;
    };

    return function( x, y ) {
        x = Math.abs( x );
        y = Math.abs( y );

        var a = greater( x, y ),
            i = a,
            b = ( i === x ) ? y : x;

        for ( ; i >= 1; i-- ) {
            if ( a % i === 0 && b % i === 0 ) return i;
        }

        return 1;
    };

})();​

I'm trying to make it work like Wolfram Alpha because you can put in fractions with large dividens and it doesn't freeze one bit when showing you its quick-rendered result.

http://wolframalpha.com/

Can anyone fix this code to work with larger numbers. I'd figure you'd have to use a different algorithm than mine. On the other hand, does anyone know WA's algorithm or can direct me to a site where I can find out?

share|improve this question
    
Can you give an example of what a "large" number would be? – Pointy Jul 31 '12 at 17:31
    
Fractions with dividens more than 7 or 8 digits. – 0x499602D2 Jul 31 '12 at 17:33
    
take a look at following tutorial about using typed 64bit arrays in JavaScript, i'm not sure if it's completely adequate but it's the best i know html5rocks.com/en/tutorials/webgl/typed_arrays – Willem D'Haeseleer Jul 31 '12 at 17:33
1  
You might want to look up Euclid's Greatest Common Denominator algorithm. He was a pretty smart guy. – Pointy Jul 31 '12 at 17:34
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Replace fraction.factor() with this:

function gcd(a, b) {
    if (b > a) return gcd(b, a);
    if (b === 0) return a;
    return gcd(b, a % b);
};

That's Euclid's algorithm, which can serve as a great introduction to Number Theory. It'll run way faster than your iterative approach.

share|improve this answer
    
You're right. It does work considerably faster. – 0x499602D2 Jul 31 '12 at 17:47
    
Can you explain what it does? Thanks! – 0x499602D2 Jul 31 '12 at 22:17
    
@David well the Wikipedia page is informative, if typically over-dense. The idea comes from some fairly simple things you can prove in basic number theory. By iterating on the remainder of dividing the smaller number into the larger number, you'll finally get to the point where one number is a multiple of the other. That number, then, will evenly divide all the steps in between, all the way up to the original two numbers. (Of course, the answer may be 1, which means the numbers are relatively prime.) – Pointy Jul 31 '12 at 22:24
    
And it's faster because instead of iterating by 1, it "hops" in big leaps because it's doing a division problem. That is, the number being tested as a possible divisor gets smaller relatively quickly. – Pointy Jul 31 '12 at 22:25
    
@David if you're interested, this book (Elementary Number Theory by Underwood Dudley) is a great introduction to the topic. Number theory is really fascinating; I'm a rank amateur :-) – Pointy Jul 31 '12 at 22:26

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