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This is for a library management system.

I have two tables, one is Books with fields BookId, Title, AuthorId, PublisherId, ISBN, ISBN13, PublishedOn, NumberOfPages, etc etc.

Other is BookTransactions that contains all the transaction of books that are issued to, or received from any student, with fields TransactionId, BookId, IssuedOn, IssuedTo, ReceviedOn, etc. etc.

Now the problem is, let's say I have this book The God Delusion, and there are 200 copies of it. The entry in Books table would be like this

7  The God Delusion  21  32  0618680004  978-0618680009 .....
8  The God Delusion  21  32  0618680004  978-0618680009 .....
9  The God Delusion  21  32  0618680004  978-0618680009 .....
10 The God Delusion  21  32  0618680004  978-0618680009 .....
.
.
.

(200 rows). Everything else is exactly the same, just there are 200 entries for each book, now I know I can have a column named Quantity, but hear this (and that's why the question)

The table BookTransactions might look a like this after a while

1   9    4/3/2012   ABC   __  
2   10   4/3/2012   PQR   __  
3   7    4/3/2012   XYZ   7/3/2012

Thus clearly indicating the 3 'The God Delusion' book were issued on same day. The benefit is that I can check that if book number 7 is issued or not, if not then I can issue it, something like this

sqlCommand.CommandText = "SELECT Count(*) FROM BookTransactions WHERE BookId=7 AND ReceivedOn is NULL";
// if a book is received, its in library and can be issued again
if (Int32.Parse(sqlCommand.ExecuteScalar().ToString()) == 0)
    bookInstance.IssueThisBook();
else
   MessageBox.Show("This book is already issued to someone, please select a different book");

Now the problem with having a column quantity is that say if Books table looked like this

7  The God Delusion  21  32  0618680004  978-0618680009 ..... 200 
// the last one indicates quantity

The entry in BookTransaction now will look like this

1   7    4/3/2012   ABC   __

and now if run this code,

sqlCommand.CommandText = "SELECT Count(*) FROM BookTransactions WHERE BookId=7 AND ReceivedOn is NULL";
// if a book is received, its in library and can be issued again
if (Int32.Parse(sqlCommand.ExecuteScalar().ToString()) == 0)
    bookInstance.IssueThisBook();
else
   MessageBox.Show("This book is already issued to someone, please select a different book");

It will show that the book is issued to someone, even though only one copy is issued and there are still 199 copies remaining in the library.

I know there are many ways to overcome this, one way that I can think of is to do something like this

sqlCommand.CommandText = "SELECT Count(*) FROM BookTransactions WHERE BookId=7 AND ReceivedOn is NULL";
sqlCommandOther.CommandText = "SELECT Quantity FROM Books WHERE Bookid=7"
// if the count is not equal to total quantity then there are some books availabe in libray
if (Int32.Parse(sqlCommand.ExecuteScalar().ToString()) != Int32.Parse(sqlCommandOther.ExecuteScalar().ToString()))
    bookInstance.IssueThisBook();
else
// all books are currently issued
   MessageBox.Show("All copies of this book are already issued, please select a different book");

Well, this is the only way I could think of, but I know this is not efficient, I want to know is there another way I can remove this redundancy of having 200 rows in books just because there are 200 copies? (and I mean any other way except what I described in previous paragraph.) What would be the best way to achieve what I am trying to do.
I hope I made myself clear.

Edit StarPilot's point is worth noticing. Do I really need 200 different rows/records? Because just like he pointed out, how will I track if a particular book, say #50 is lost or damaged? Taking this into part it does looks like there must be redundancy, right?

share|improve this question
    
Can you please remove all PhP code, just write the SQL only? Your Post is very hard to read. –  srini.venigalla Jul 31 '12 at 17:50
1  
If you need to track 200 physical books, it makes sense that each book needs its own entry for tracking purposes. How else would you track book #50 has been damaged or lost? The only issue I see is if it is worth normalizing your book titles. If you have 200 rows of The God Delusion because you have 200 books in your library, do you really want to keep repeating that title? Or should you just have a list of all book titles, and use it as a key in your maste book list? –  StarPilot Jul 31 '12 at 17:53
    
@srini.venigalla This is not php! Its C# –  Razort4x Jul 31 '12 at 18:19
    
@StarPilot Yeah that actually does makes sense –  Razort4x Jul 31 '12 at 18:20

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try structuring your database like the following.

Book { BookId, Title, AuthorId, PublisherId, ISBN, ISBN13, PublishedOn, NumberOfPages, etc }
BookStock { BookStockId, BookId, StockDateTime }
BookCheckOut { BookCheckOutId, BookStockId, CheckOutDate, CheckInDate, Quantity }

The BookStock table would hold one row for every book, and the BookCheckOut table will hold a new row every time a check out occurs. So, it's trival to find out how many are in stock with the following query.

SELECT COUNT(bs.BookStockId) - (SELECT COUNT(bco.BookCheckOutId) FROM BookCheckOut bco WHERE bco.BookStockId = bs.BookStockId AND bco.CheckInDate IS NULL) FROM BookStock bs

Furthermore, it's very trival to get all of the actual checked out books with this query.

SELECT * FROM BookCheckOut WHERE BookStockId = {id} AND CheckInDate IS NULL

And finally, you've removed the duplication of the book, it's only in the database once. Generally speaking, when working with inventory, you need to track all transactions and not just a quantity. It may feel a little over-designed to you but the BookStock table can easily be used later to place in who stocked it, or even furthermore use bar code scanning to stock books by scanning the ISBN number. Imagine scanning the ISBN number, lookup the book on that, and just adding a row to the BookStock table and BOOM you've added stock!

Oh, and finally you could use bar code scanning to check in really easily because the BookCheckOut can easily navigate to and from the Book.

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You have to differentiate between book (title) and copy. That means you should have

  1. table for books, which will contain information about books and have only one row per book;

  2. table for copies, which will contain as many rows per book as many copies you have (preferably with some serial number allowing you to tell one copy from other), having BookId as foreign key

  3. table for transactions having CopyId as foreign key.

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It depends quite a bit on what you need to do with this data.

If you only care about whether there are any books of a given title left to issue, you can do exactly what you did and use a quantity field in Books that you can decrement every time a book is issued and increment every time it is returned. To know that there are or are not additional copies remaining, you only need to know that the counter is greater than zero or not. If you also need to track how many books are currently issued, you can keep an original quantity in the Books table as well and use it to compare against the current count.

If you think you are going to need to track each individual copy of a book, you can still remove a lot of redundancy by keeping all the invariant data of a book in the Books table, and using a BookInstance table (or something like that) to keep track of the individual instances. That way you can still link issuing transactions to individual instances of books, but not carry around all the redundant data that your original design includes.

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You need another table - call it BookMaster. It would include an id, and all common data about the book, such as title, author, etc. Your present Books table would then have a BookMasterId column to connect the two tables. You would then have a single BookMaster record for "The God Delusion", and you would still have 200 Book records, so you can track each individual copy.

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I would suggest a new table "BookCopies" to track the different copies. CopyNumber, BookID (dual primary key) and maybe something like a Status "Available, Lost, etc"

You can then query against your copies table for the availble status instead of the Transactions table that will likely be very large over time.

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