Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm creating a temporary table and populating it with two separate statements using the same command and connection. However, I'm getting an 'Invalid object name' if I create the table with the parameter inserted before the create. If I add it after the create, it works fine.

The temporary table is supposed to last the entire session, so I don't see what it matters when the parameter is added to the command object.

FAILS:

        using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection("Data Source=.;Initial Catalog=TEST;Integrated Security=True;"))
        using (SqlCommand cmd = conn.CreateCommand())
        {
            conn.Open();

            cmd.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("@ID", 1234));

            cmd.CommandText = "CREATE TABLE #Test (ID INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY, I INT NOT NULL)";
            cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();

            cmd.CommandText = "INSERT INTO #Test VALUES (@ID, 1)";
            cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();

            ..... more code that uses the table

        }

WORKS:

        using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection("Data Source=.;Initial Catalog=TEST;Integrated Security=True;"))
        using (SqlCommand cmd = conn.CreateCommand())
        {
            conn.Open();

            cmd.CommandText = "CREATE TABLE #Test (ID INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY, I INT NOT NULL)";
            cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();

            cmd.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("@ID", 1234));

            cmd.CommandText = "INSERT INTO #Test VALUES (@ID, 1)";
            cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();

            ..... more code that uses the table

        }

edit:

SQL Profiler shed more light on this.

If the command has any parameters, the underlying code is issuing an "exec sp_executesql". If the Parameters are cleared, the underlying code issues a more direct "CREATE TABLE". Temp tables are cleaned up after an sp_executesql, which explains what I'm seeing here.

To me, this would be a bug in the SqlCommand (or related) code but since I now have an explanation I can move on.

share|improve this question
    
What error message are you getting –  HatSoft Jul 31 '12 at 17:52
    
It's a SqlException being thrown, "Invalid object name '#Test'" –  mford Jul 31 '12 at 18:56
    
Yes, this is standard as it adds a small amount of additional protection against SQL injection. If you need you can use a Stored Procedure to do the work or combine the commands into one query. –  Trisped Jul 31 '12 at 19:54
    
Although you can use a command object to execute multiple statements I don't think that's a good approach.It's better to have a command that executes a batch or a command for each statement thus each command will have its own parameter list. –  Beatles1692 Jul 1 '13 at 4:42

2 Answers 2

The problem is in fact in "exec sp_executesql" statement. When ADO detects that there are parameters declared in the sqlCommand, uses by default "sp_executesql" instead of "exec". But in this case, the first command is creating a TEMPORAL table and, as known, temporal tables are only valid inside a stored procedure (sp_executesql) and are deleted when exit. So consequently the second INSERT statement is not longer valid in the first example code. In the second one, the temporal table is created sucessfully and the insert statement is executed normally. Hope it helps.

share|improve this answer

I suspect the state of the first execution fails because it insists that each parameter must be used.

share|improve this answer
    
It doesn't work that way on any other statement. The command object can have any number of parameters and it only uses the ones that are used in the statement. –  mford Jul 31 '12 at 18:52
    
Also, the create isn't failing. See edit above for more info. –  mford Jul 31 '12 at 20:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.