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I'm trying to loop through all the lines in a document using FORTRAN 77 and comparing particular line positions to strings and then editing it.

E.g.:

|BXK   |00640.3A  |AWP |1.01|
|BUCKEYE MUNICIPAL AIRPORT                                             |08794|

I want to change the 08794 to 0871994 in the second line.

This is what I have so far:

       PROGRAM CONVERSION
    IMPLICIT NONE
    CHARACTER(LEN=120) :: ROW
    CHARACTER(LEN=2) :: DATE1='19', DATE2='20'
    INTEGER :: DATENUMBER
    INTEGER :: J

    OPEN(UNIT=1, FILE='BXK__96B.TXT', STATUS ='OLD')
    OPEN(UNIT=2, FILE='BXK__96B_MODIFIED.TXT', STATUS='UKNOWN')

    DO J=1,10000
    READ(1,'(A)') ROW
        IF (J==2) THEN
            DATENUMBER = ICHAR(ROW(76))
            IF ((DATENUMBER.LE.9) .AND. (DATENUMBER.GE.2)) THEN
                WRITE(2, '(A)' ROW(1:75), DATE1, ROW(76:120))
            ELSE 
                WRITE(2, '(A)' ROW(1:75), DATE2, ROW(76:120))
            ENDIF
        END IF
    END DO
    CONTINUE
    CLOSE(1)
    CLOSE(2)

    END
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Some of your code is missing. You've started a DO-loop, but not ended it; and you don't have any reads or writes. –  David Gorsline Jul 31 '12 at 19:10
1  
Your code is not Fortran 77, why do you want to write the code in F77? –  haraldkl Jul 31 '12 at 19:30
    
If you need to parse text, you most likely will need the intrinsic functions "index" and/or "scan", with them you could identify the position of your separators and split a line into individual columns, modify those you need and write everything back. –  haraldkl Jul 31 '12 at 19:37
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1 Answer 1

Ahh, so what you mean is, you want to convert the 2-digit representation of the year found at the right end of line 2 into its 4-digit representation. You seem already to have figured out how to find the position of the leading digit of the year, ie 76. Rather easier than what you have written would be

integer :: year
.
.
.
read(line(76:77),'(i2)') year  ! this reads year from the characters in positions 76,77
if (20<=year.and.year<=90) then  ! not sure if this precisely your test
   year = year+1900
else
   year = year+2000
end if

write(line(76:79),'(i4)') year

I haven't gone to the trouble of integrating this into the rest of your code, that should be straightforward, if not ask for more help.

Actually, I suppose you probably haven't figured out how to find the column at which you want to start reading the year from line 2. Precisely how you do this depends on what the format of your file really is. The functions you need to familiarise yourself with are, as one of the comments tells you INDEX and SCAN.

If you are looking for the 4th character after the 2nd occurrence of | in line 2 you could do it this way:

integer :: posn_of_2nd_vertical_bar
.
.
.
posn_of_2nd_vertical_bar = scan(row(scan(row,'|')+1:),'|')

and then replace your constant 76 with posn_of_2nd_vertical_bar+4

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