Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm a powershell. I've been staring at my screen for most of the afternoon trying to figure out how to compare the file hash of multiple files that are in two different directories. The script will download files from an FTP site into a directory ($cDlPath) and eventually copy them to another directory ($cDestPath). I want to compare the filehash from the files to be sure nothing has changed since they were downloaded. I'm using the Get-Hash cmdlet to get the file hash, but I can't figure out how to compare the two hashes. If the files are unequal I want to be able to identify the altered file(s) by name so the files can be checked.

I've been fiddling around with the code below, but it doesn't seem to be what I'm after.

Compare-Object `
-ReferenceObject $(Get-ChildItem $cDestPath -Recurse | Where-Object {!$_.psiscontainer } | Get-Hash -Algorithm $cHashAlg) `
-DifferenceObject $(Get-ChildItem  $cDlPath -Recurse | Where-Object {!$_.psiscontainer } | Get-Hash -Algorithm $cHashAlg)

Any help would be greatly appreciated.


I'm using the code below and I seem to be a little closer.

Compare-Object $(Get-ChildItem $cDlPath -Recurse $_ | Where-Object { !$_.PsIsContainer } |  
  Select-Object Name, FullName, Length, @{Name=”SHA256 Hash”; Expression={ Get-Hash $_.FullName  
  -Algorithm "SHA256" }}, LastWriteTime) $( Get-ChildItem $cDestPath -Recurse $_ | Where-Object  
  { !$_.PsIsContainer } | Select-Object Name, FullName, Length, @{Name=”SHA256 Hash”; 
  Expression={ Get-Hash $_.FullName -Algorithm "SHA256" }}, LastWriteTime) -property @
  ("Name", “FullName”,”SHA256 Hash”, "Length", "LastWriteTime" ) | Add-Content -Path $cLogFile

It still looks like it isn't completely right though because there are some hashes that are the same and the output to the logfile is ugly. The files should only be in the log file if they have the same hash.

@{Name=nothing.xlsx; FullName=C:\Test\nothing.xlsx; SHA256 Hash=E74424B6324DE014CB0C896DA29D67A2A729E31DF57119E840CA4BD9A9E41754; Length=8891; LastWriteTime=7/31/2012 1:33:11 PM; SideIndicator=<=}
@{Name=test.txt; FullName=C:\Test\test.txt; SHA256 Hash=FC43E73579DB001751A29C1F7A8E2E36E46A53662B63013F0AE500AA896DE056; Length=174; LastWriteTime=7/31/2012 4:52:52 PM; SideIndicator=<=}
@{Name=testfile.txt; FullName=C:\Test\testfile.txt; SHA256 Hash=2B2DB80CAF93224A49A7C94E8EA5BCB1B86D421EA2DB83285149ECAE6DEAA105; Length=415; LastWriteTime=7/27/2012 12:01:21 PM; SideIndicator=<=}
@{Name=nothing.xlsx; FullName=C:\Test\Old\nothing.xlsx; SHA256 Hash=22603417927343A485862CE93790203EE7C2DB092C2060C92D44B736A01FD37E; Length=8978; LastWriteTime=7/31/2012 4:40:43 PM; SideIndicator=<=}
@{Name=test.txt; FullName=C:\Test\Old\test.txt; SHA256 Hash=FC43E73579DB001751A29C1F7A8E2E36E46A53662B63013F0AE500AA896DE056; Length=174; LastWriteTime=7/31/2012 4:52:52 PM; SideIndicator=<=}
@{Name=testfile.txt; FullName=C:\Test\Old\testfile.txt; SHA256 Hash=0B35A9F7F500B46469E2C1759F92D222983C4FDF4AAE316C0F2861FC70D0FD2B; Length=447; LastWriteTime=7/31/2012 4:52:40 PM; SideIndicator=<=}
share|improve this question
    
Will the files have the same name in each folder? –  EBGreen Jul 31 '12 at 19:08
    
They will not always have the same name but they could. –  mack Jul 31 '12 at 20:49
    
Ok, that changes things a bit. –  EBGreen Jul 31 '12 at 20:50

4 Answers 4

So here is an untested solution that should at least get you going in the right direction:

#first make a hash table of the files in folder 1 where the keys are the file hashes and the values are the file objects
$folder1Files = @{}
foreach($file in $cDestPath){
    $hash = Get-Hash $file
    if($folder1Files.ContainsKey($hash)){
        # A hash collision isn't likely but not unheard of. You should probably just handle them manually
        'There was a hash collision for {0} and {1} in folder {2}' -f $file.Name, $folder1Files[$hash].Name, $cDestPath
    }else{
        $folder1Files[$hash] = $file
    }
}
# Now do the same thing for folder 2
$folder2Files = @{}
foreach($file in $cDlPath){
    $hash = Get-Hash $file
    if($folder2Files.ContainsKey($hash)){
        # A hash collision isn't likely but not unheard of. You should probably just handle them manually
        'There was a hash collision for {0} and {1} in folder {2}' -f $file.Name, $folder1Files[$hash].Name, $cDlPath
    }else{
        $folder2Files[$hash] = $file
    }
}
# Actually you should really take those two bits and generalize them to a function that you pass a folder to and it returns the hash table.

# Now that you have your two sets of file hashes, use Compare-Object to find the diffs
$comparison = Compare-Object $folder1Files.Keys $folder2Files.Keys
foreach($diff in $comparison){
    if($diff.SideIndicator -eq '<='){
        'File {0} in folder {1} is different from any file in the other folder' -f $folder1Files[$diff.InputObject], $cDestPath
    }else{
        'File {0} in folder {1} is different from any file in the other folder' -f $folder2Files[$diff.InputObject], $cDLPath
    }
}

Like I say, I don't have the time right now to test and work out any bugs, but at the least that should serve as pseudo-code for how I would tackle this.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I'll work on it with this in mind and let you know the result. –  mack Aug 1 '12 at 17:43

This works pretty well for me - comparing two branches of source code. Groups with a count of 1 don't have a MD5 hash twin in the other branch e.g.:

$paths = 'c:\proj\trunk\source','c:\proj\branches\release\1.0\source'
ls $paths -r *.cs | Where {$_.PSPath -notmatch '\\obj\\'} | 
    Get-Hash | Select Path,HashString | Group HashString | 
    Where {$_.Count -eq 1} | Sort Count -desc | Format-List
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Keith. I'm going to try this out. –  mack Aug 20 '12 at 18:00
up vote 0 down vote accepted

There has to be a prettier solution, but this is what I ended up using.

# Get the file hashes
$hashsourcefile = Get-Hash $file -Algorithm "SHA256"
$hashdestfile = Get-Hash $file2 -Algorithm "SHA256"

# Compare the hashes
Compare-Object -Referenceobject $hashsourcefile -Differenceobject $hashdestfile | % { If ($_.Sideindicator -ne " ==") {$diff+=1} }                  

# The Hashes are different. Note this in the log
if ($diff -ne 0)
{
    Add-Content -Path $cLogFile -Value " Source File Hash: $hashsourcefile does not equal 
    Existing Destination File Hash: $hashdestfile the files are NOT EQUAL."
}
share|improve this answer

I realize this is a stale thread (16 months old), but it was the top result in Google, which means it's getting a lot of views. I think this might benefit others...

Mack was right, there is a prettier & much simpler solution using Get-Hash. You can simply compare the hashes within the IF statement by comparing the HashString.

# Get the file hashes
$hashSrc = Get-Hash $file -Algorithm "SHA256"
$hashDest = Get-Hash $file2 -Algorithm "SHA256"

# Compare the hashes & note this in the log
If ($hashSrc.HashString -ne $hashDest.HashString)
{
  Add-Content -Path $cLogFile -Value " Source File Hash: $hashSrc does not 
  equal Existing Destination File Hash: $hashDest the files are NOT EQUAL."
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.