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I have the following simplified class I'm mocking:

class myClass(object):
    @staticmethod
    def A():
        #...

    def check(self):
        #code...
        value = self.A()
        #more code...

In my first test I mock only the method A

from django.test import TestCase
from mock import MagicMock
import myClass

class FirstTest(TestCase):

def setUp(self):
    myClass.A = MagicMock(return_value = 'CPU')

def test(self):
    #some tests 
    myClassObj = myClass()
    myClassObj.check()

Whereas in my second test I mock the entire check method:

from django.test import TestCase
from mock import MagicMock
import myClass

class SecondTest(TestCase):

def setUp(self):
    myClass.check = MagicMock(return_value = someObject)

def test(self):
    #some tests 
    myClassObj = myClass()
    myClassObj.check()

Now my assertions from my first test fail because, instead of calling check() and mocking A() inside check(), it calls the completely mocked check() from my second test.

Is there any way to clear and set the method to be 'normal' after the test? I tried myClass.check.reset_mock() already, but it doesn't seem to do anything. Moving the order of my tests doesn't do anything either.

I'm using mock 1.0b1 for python from http://pypi.python.org/pypi/mock/

share|improve this question
    
Hi Dana, would you mind posting (perhaps simplified) the code represented by '#some tests'? It will give me a clearer idea of what you want to achieve. – aychedee Aug 2 '12 at 16:37
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can stash the function away on self and put it back when you're done.

import unittest

from mock import MagicMock
from MyClass import MyClass

class FirstTest(unittest.TestCase):

    def setUp(self):
        self.A = MyClass.A
        MyClass.A = MagicMock(name='mocked A', return_value='CPU')


    def tearDown(self):
        MyClass.A = self.A

    def test_mocked_static_method(self):
        print 'First Test'
        print MyClass.check
        print MyClass.A


class SecondTest(unittest.TestCase):

    def setUp(self):
        MyClass.check = MagicMock(name='mocked check', return_value=object)

    def test_check_mocked_check_method(self):
        print 'Second Test'
        print MyClass.check
        print MyClass.A


if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()

Running this file gives the following output:

First Test
<unbound method MyClass.check> 
<MagicMock name='mocked A' id='141382732'>
Second Test
<MagicMock name='mocked check' id='141382860'>
<unbound method MyClass.A>

I found myself using the patch decorator a lot more than setUp and tearDown now. In this case you could do

from mock import patch

@patch('MyClass.A')
def test_mocked_static_method(self, mocked_A)
    mocked_A.return_value = 'CPU'
    # This mock will expire when the test method is finished
share|improve this answer
1  
Thank you for your help :). Sorry I didn't respond to your comment, I was busy trying to figure out some other things :( – SaiyanGirl Aug 3 '12 at 19:04
2  
No worries! Mocking is one of the more confusing things I've ever had to learn, happy to help. – aychedee Aug 4 '12 at 8:56

You can use mock.patch as a decorator or a context manager:

from mock import patch, MagicMock

@patch('myClass.A', MagicMock(return_value='CPU'))
def test(self):
    pass

or:

def test(self):
    with patch('myClass.A', MagicMock(return_value='CPU')):
        pass

If you don't supply a mock object to patch then it will provide an autospecced mock that you can modify:

@patch('myClass.A')
def test(self, mock_A):
    mock_A.return_value = 'CPU'
    pass

or:

def test(self):
    with patch('myClass.A') as mock_A:
        mock_A.return_value = 'CPU'
        pass

In all cases the original value will be restored when the decorated test function or context manager finishes.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thank you for your help :). I could only select one right answer, but I upvoted some of your other answers so you get more points :) – SaiyanGirl Aug 3 '12 at 18:57
2  
beautiful, the patch decorator is very useful – Richard Knop Jan 10 '13 at 16:59
    
@SaiyanGirl: While I understand your will to compensate for the provided effort, answers should be upvoted because there are right in themselves, not because the author got it right on another question. – ereOn Mar 19 '15 at 19:52
    
This is the best answer. – YPCrumble Aug 11 '15 at 19:47

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