Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to join a table to another table where either of two fields in the first table are keys to the second table.

The second table just has some additional info I'd like to pull in if I get a match on either of the fields in the first table.

Table network

id | inviter | invitee | status

Table userinfo

id | userid | name

Query if were not accessing 2nd table

"SELECT * from network where inviter= '22' OR invitee ='22'"

I think it is something like the following but cannot figure out syntax:

"SELECT n.*,u.* from `network`, n
left join `users`, u on
n.inviter = u.id OR n.invitee= u.id
WHERE n.inviter = '22' or n.invitee= '22'"

Many thanks for any suggestions.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

You have the syntax almost correct except that you don't want a comma between the table and its alias a or u (optionally use the AS keyword), AND you need a second join against userinfo because you need different data for the inviter and invitee:

SELECT
  /* Use column aliases to distinguish inviter/invitee details */
  n.id AS n_id,
  n.status,
  inviter.userid AS inviter_userid,
  inviter.name AS inviter_name,
  invitee.userid AS invitee_userid,
  invitee.name AS invitee_name
FROM
  network AS n
  /* JOIN against `userinfo` twice: once to get inviter, once for invitee */
  /* aliased as inviter/invitee */
  LEFT JOIN userinfo AS inviter ON n.inviter = inviter.userid
  LEFT JOIN userinfo AS invitee ON n.invitee = invitee.userid
WHERE 
  n.inviter = 22
  OR n.invitee = 22

Update:

To return only one or the other of these which matches, you can modify it with a CASE statement to figure out which of them is the same as the value in the WHERE clause:

SELECT
  /* Use column aliases to distinguish inviter/invitee details */
  n.id AS n_id,
  n.status,
  /* Return only one name, whichever matches the same value as in WHERE */
  CASE 
    WHEN inviter.userid = 22 THEN inviter.name
    WHEN invitee.userid = 22 THEN invitee.name
  END AS name
FROM
  network AS n
  /* JOIN against `userinfo` twice: once to get inviter, once for invitee */
  /* aliased as inviter/invitee */
  LEFT JOIN userinfo AS inviter ON n.inviter = inviter.userid
  LEFT JOIN userinfo AS invitee ON n.invitee = invitee.userid
WHERE 
  n.inviter = 22
  OR n.invitee = 22

Update 2:

Okay, thinking harder about it, if all you need is the name of the id you already know (22), there is no need for 2 joins. You still need to use the CASE in a subquery but it only has to return the id.

SELECT
  n.*,
  u.*
FROM (
  SELECT
    id AS n_id,
    status,
    CASE 
      WHEN inviter = 22 THEN inviter 
      WHEN invitee = 22 THEN invitee 
    END AS i_id
  FROM network
  WHERE inviter = 22 OR invitee = 22
) n JOIN userinfo u ON n.i_id = userinfo.userid
share|improve this answer
    
can I skip the column aliases? Once I pull the data, I don't want to distinguish between inviter and invitee..actually want to display/merge them together. –  user1260310 Aug 1 '12 at 14:05
    
@user1260310 You will need the aliases if you are going to use this in an API where you need to refer to columns by name rather than position. Otherwise, just see if it returns what you need - I put the aliases in somewhat arbitrarily since otherwise there would be name conflicts. –  Michael Berkowski Aug 1 '12 at 14:12
    
When I follow your syntax above, the query runs fine, however, I now have two sets of fields for the userinfo data. For display I want to just say something like $row['name'] for each record and have it print out name no matter if it is an inviter or invitee match but don't think I can do this. Skipping the alias for joins and joining both statements on n.invitee = userinfo.userid throws an error. Not sure what to do. –  user1260310 Aug 1 '12 at 16:20
    
You have two sets of fields because you have two different possible values. How do you determine which one to show? You just want to show the one that matches the WHERE clause (22)? –  Michael Berkowski Aug 1 '12 at 16:22
    
The logic should be that if there is a match on inviter or invitee, it uses the value 22, to go into the userinfo table and pull the info for that user. The value 22 is unique as is the record in userinfo for that user. –  user1260310 Aug 1 '12 at 16:42

Try this:

SELECT a.inviter, a.invitee, a.status,b.userid, b.name FROM network a INNER JOIN userinfo b ON a.id = '22' AND b.id = '22';

To use multiple keys for a join, try the following:

SELECT SELECT a.inviter, a.invitee, a.status,b.userid, b.name FROM network a INNER JOIN userinfo b ON a.invitee = '22' AND b.userid = '22' OR a.inviter = '22' AND b.userid ='22';
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.