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Support seems to be different across browsers..

Check the link

Firefox: Black with white text.

Opera, Chrome, IE9: Blue with black text.

Which is correct and how would I make it consistent?

The code

@media screen and (min-width: 480px) {

    body{
        background-color:#6aa6cc;
        color:#000;    
    }

    @media screen and (min-width: 768px) {

        body{
            background-color:#000;
            color:#fff;    
        }
    }
}

Interestingly enough it appears that nesting media queries within a conditional @import does seem to work.

e.g:

Index.html

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
    <meta charset="utf-8" />
    <title>Media test</title>
    <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="importer.css" />
</head>
<body>
    <h1>Why is this not consistent.</h1>
</body>
</html>

importer.css

@import url(media.css) screen and (min-width: 480px);

media.css

body {
    background-color: #6aa6cc;
    color: #000;
}

@media screen and (min-width:768px) {
    body {
        background-color: #000;
        color: #fff;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
You have a double ## in your first body rule... might want to update your fiddle. Not that it makes any apparent difference... –  BoltClock Jul 31 '12 at 18:37
    
Cheers. Fixed. Strange isn't it? –  James South Jul 31 '12 at 18:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 47 down vote accepted

The short answer is that while nesting @media rules (and not just media queries) is allowed in CSS3, it wasn't allowed in CSS2.1, mostly because there wasn't a reason to allow it seeing as media queries did not yet exist.

Firefox was the first to support nested @media rules, however since the time this answer was first posted, other browsers have slowly caught up. Namely, Chrome (and similarly, Blink Opera) has been updated to support it.

As far as I am aware, Safari and IE still do not support it yet.


There's a bit of terminology confusion that needs clearing up in order for us to understand what exactly is happening.

The code you have refers to @media rules, and not so much media queries — the media query itself is the component that follows the @media token, whereas the rule is the entire block of code consisting of @media, the media query, and the rules nested within its set of curly braces.

This may cause confusion among many when it comes to using media queries in CSS, as well as your specific case where a @media rule in an imported stylesheet works correctly even when the @import is accompanied by another media query. Notice that media queries can occur in both @media and @import rules. They're the same thing, but they're being used to restrictively apply style rules in different ways.

Now, the actual issue here is that nested @media rules are not valid in CSS2.1 because you're not allowed to nest any at-rules within @media rules. However, things seem quite different in CSS3. Namely, the Conditional Rules module states very clearly that @media rules can be nested, even providing an example:

For example, with this set of nested rules:

@media print { // rule (1)
  #navigation { display: none }
  @media (max-width: 12cm) { // rule (2)
    .note { float: none }
  }
}

the condition of the rule marked (1) is true for print media, and the condition of the rule marked (2) is true when the width of the display area (which for print media is the page box) is less than or equal to 12cm. Thus the rule ‘#navigation { display: none }’ applies whenever this style sheet is applied to print media, and the rule ‘.note { float: none }’ is applied only when the style sheet is applied to print media and the width of the page box is less than or equal to 12 centimeters.

Furthermore, it looks like Firefox is following this specification and processing the rules accordingly, whereas the other browsers are still treating it the CSS2.1 way.

The grammar in the Syntax module hasn't been updated to reflect this yet, though; it still disallows nesting of at-rules within @media rules as with CSS2.1. This specification is slated for a rewrite anyway, so I guess this doesn't matter.

Basically, CSS3 allows it (pending rewriting the Syntax module), but not CSS2.1 (because it neither defines media queries nor allows nested @media rule blocks). And while at least one browser has begun supporting the new spec, I wouldn't call other browsers buggy; instead, I'll say that they simply haven't caught up yet as they're really conforming to an older, more stable spec.

Lastly, the reason why your @import works is because @import is able to work conditionally with the help of a media query. However this has no relation to the @media rule in your imported stylesheet. These are in fact two separate things, and are treated as such by all browsers.

To make your code work consistently across browsers, you can either use your @import statement, or, since both of your rules use min-width, simply remove the nesting of your @media rules:

@media screen and (min-width: 480px) {
    body {
        background-color: #6aa6cc;
        color: #000;
    }
}

@media screen and (min-width: 768px) {
    body {
        background-color: #000;
        color: #fff;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that. Interesting stuff. I added the @import example just to show that it works. I'm always amazed how this kind of stuff can be touted as supported by browsers but with vastly different behaviours. –  James South Jul 31 '12 at 19:16
1  
@James South: Indeed. I've also added some explanation for your @import example. After rereading the spec I felt I needed to go over that for you. –  BoltClock Jul 31 '12 at 19:18
    
Thanks, for the tldr :) Doesn't work in IE –  Eru Penkman Jun 23 at 4:49

protected by Kermit Sep 24 at 12:38

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