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The constructor of class StructComponent takes a different logic to initialize its member variables based on the type of the pass-in object of info. Here I use casting to convert the pass-in parameter to right subclass object.

class StructComponent
{
public:
    StructComponent(const ClassA& info)
    {
        if (info.getType() == CLASS_B)
        {
            const ClassC& classC = dynamic_cast<const ClassC&> info;
            ...
            apply a different logic for ClassB and init member accordingly
        } else if (info.getType() == CLASS_C) {
            apply a different logic for others
            ...
        } else {
                    apply default
            }
    }
}

class ClassA
{
public:
    ClassA(...)
    {
        m_shp = CreateStructComponent();
    }   
    virtual boost::shared_ptr<StructComponent> CreateStructComponent()
    {
        return boost::shared_ptr<StructComponent> (new StructComponent(*this));     
    }

    ...
    int getType() const { return CLASS_A; }

protected:
    boost::shared_ptr<StructComponent> m_shp;
}

class ClassB : public ClassA
{
public:
    ...

    virtual boost::shared_ptr<StructComponent> CreateStructComponent()
    {
        return boost::shared_ptr<StructComponent> (new StructComponent(*this));     
    }   
    ...
    int getType() const { return CLASS_B; } 
}

class ClassC : public ClassA
{
public:
    ...

    virtual boost::shared_ptr<StructComponent> CreateStructComponent()
    {
        return boost::shared_ptr<StructComponent> (new StructComponent(*this));     
    }   
    ...
    int getType() const { return CLASS_C; } 
}

Q1> Is the code correct ignore the potential design issue?

Q2> Assuem all subclass of ClassA has the same implementation body of the function CreateStructComponent. Is there a way that I can save space not to repeatedly do the same code as follows:

return boost::shared_ptr<StructComponent> (new StructComponent(*this));

Q3> Is there a better design that I can use? For example, is there a way that I can ignore casting in the StructComponent?

share|improve this question
    
Q2) Yes. Q1/3) You shouldn't have to know the concrete type of your object. Give ClassA a suitable virtual initialization function (possibly accepting a StructComponent&) and just call that. –  Kerrek SB Jul 31 '12 at 19:35
    
@KerrekSB, in the current design StructComponent does need to know the type of the passed-in in order to make correct initialization. I will update my code and make it clear. –  q0987 Jul 31 '12 at 19:38
    
I don't see why you have to redefine CreateStructComponent at all in the derived classes, as all of them are identical. –  DanielKO Jul 31 '12 at 19:39
    
@DanielKO, you are right. In the real code, each one is different. The reason I put this way is to confirm my guess of Q2. –  q0987 Jul 31 '12 at 19:40
    
Also, there's a general design principle: Make non-leaf classes abstract. That obviates the need for repeated "create" functions. –  Kerrek SB Jul 31 '12 at 20:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

1) No, it's not correct, at least, it doesn't do what you probably expect. It calls a virtual function in the constructor of ClassA, which will always call ClassA::CreateStructComponent() instead of calling the overriding function in the derived class, because when the ClassA constructor runs that dynamic type is ClassA. For the same reason, in the constructor for StructComponent the getType() call will always resolve to ClassA::getType().

2) There are lots of ways to solve that problem. You could put the code in a template, so it depends on the type, or you could just get rid of the need to duplicate the code, by doing the initialization in a different place.

3) Why not simply give StructComponent overloaded constructors, one taking ClassB, one taking ClassC and another taking ClassA?

Then again, a better solution would probably be to get rid of the StructComponent constructor and have ClassA, ClassB, or ClassC do the initialization explicitly, so that each type initializes it how it wants it done. If the initialization depends on the type that creates it, the initialization doesn't belong in the StructComponent constructor. Currently you have a circular dependency, StructComponent needs to know about all the types that use it, and all the types that use it need to know about StructComponent. That's usually a sign of a problem with the design, all the classes are tightly coupled to each other. It would be better if StrictComponent knew nothing about the other types.

Anyway, here's one possible solution, showing a way to pass the correct type to the StructComponent without duplicating code, but I don't think this is a good design. Note that the Structcomponent constructor is passed NULL, so it can do different things based on the type, but cannot access the objects it is passed.

class StructComponent
{
public:
    explicit StructComponent(const ClassA*)
    { /* something */ }

    explicit StructComponent(const ClassB*)
    { /* something else */ }

    explicit StructComponent(const ClassC*)
    { /* something completely different */ }
};

class Base
{
protected:
  template<typename T>
    explicit
    Base(const T*)
    : m_shp( boost::make_shared<StructComponent>((T*)NULL) )
    { }

    boost::shared_ptr<StructComponent> m_shp;
};

class ClassA : virtual public Base
{
public:
    ClassA() : Base(this) { }
};

class ClassB : public ClassA
{
public:
    ClassB() : Base(this) { }
};

class ClassC : public ClassA
{
public:
    ClassC() : Base(this) { }
};

Here's another, completely-different approach without virtual base hacks, still removing duplicated code, and allowing StructComponent to access the objects passed to it (which I maintain is a bad idea):

class StructComponent
{
public:
    explicit StructComponent(const ClassA& a)
    { /* something */ }

    explicit StructComponent(const ClassB& b)
    { /* something else */ }

    explicit StructComponent(const ClassC& c)
    { /* something completely different */ }
};

class ClassA
{
public:
    ClassA() : m_shp( create(*this) ) { }

protected:
    struct no_init { };

    explicit
    ClassA(no_init)
    : m_shp()
    { }

    template<typename T>
      boost::shared_ptr<StructComponent> create(const T& t)
      { return boost::make_shared<StructComponent>(t); }

    boost::shared_ptr<StructComponent> m_shp;
};

class ClassB : public ClassA
{
public:
    ClassB()
    : ClassA(no_init())
    { m_shp = create(*this); }
};

class ClassC : public ClassA
{
public:
    ClassC()
    : ClassA(no_init())
    { m_shp = create(*this); }
};

And here's yet another choice, this time without the circular dependencies, moving the different initialization code where it belongs:

struct StructComponent
{
  StructComponent() { /* minimum init */ }
};

class ClassA
{
public:
    ClassA() : m_shp( createA() ) { }

protected:
    struct no_init { };

    explicit
    ClassA(no_init)
    : m_shp()
    { }

    boost::shared_ptr<StructComponent> createA()
    {
      // something
    }

    boost::shared_ptr<StructComponent> m_shp;
};

class ClassB : public ClassA
{
public:
    ClassB()
    : ClassA(no_init())
    { m_shp = createB(); }

private:
    boost::shared_ptr<StructComponent> createB()
    {
      // something else
    }
};

class ClassC : public ClassA
{
public:
    ClassC()
    : ClassA(no_init())
    { m_shp = createC(); }

private:
    boost::shared_ptr<StructComponent> createC()
    {
      // something completely different
    }
};
share|improve this answer

During execution of the constructor of class A, the type of the object is A. The base implementation will therefore always be called. You can therefore save the trouble of retyping the implementation.

This code is incorrectly designed; and incorrectly designed code is never correct, at least in the usual meaning of the word "correct".

There is no reason why you should use a constructor for initialization if the C++ rules don't work well for you. Simply make it a method, call the thing Initialize, and you can call any virtual methods from Initialize that you desire, with the effects you seem to expect.

share|improve this answer

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