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How can I get the output of this program to work correctly? I'm not sure why the string array won't store my values and then output them at the end of my program. Thanks.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;
int main ()
{
    int score[100], score1 = -1;
    string word[100];
    do
    {
        score1 = score1 + 1;
        cout << "Please enter a score (-1 to stop): ";
        cin >> score[score1];
    }
    while (score[score1] != -1);
    {
        for (int x = 0; x < score1; x++)
        {
            cout << "Enter a string: ";
            getline(cin,word[x]);
            cin.ignore();
        }
        for (int x = 0; x < score1; x++)
        {
            cout << score[x] << "::" << word[x] << endl; // need output to be 88:: hello there.
        }
    }

}
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2  
What's not working? Give the error message, expected output, what your program actually does... –  Lanaru Jul 31 '12 at 19:52
    
Please post some sample input and output values so we can see what's going on. –  Code-Apprentice Jul 31 '12 at 20:00
    
Theres no error message. The input for example would be 15, 16, 17... hello there!, how are you?, I am fine ... and output should be 15 :: hello there! .. etc –  user1566796 Jul 31 '12 at 20:21
    
What I get is 15:: (blank) 16:: ello there! 17 :: ow are you? –  user1566796 Jul 31 '12 at 20:23
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3 Answers

I've corrected your code. Try something like this

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;
int main ()
{
    int score[100], score1 = -1;
    char word[100][100];
    do
    {
        score1++;
        cout << "Please enter a score (-1 to stop): ";
        cin >> score[score1];
    }
    while (score[score1] != -1);

    cin.ignore();

    for (int x = 0; x < score1; x++)
    {
        cout << "Enter a string: ";
        cin.getline(word[x], 100);
    }

    for (int x = 0; x < score1; x++)
    {
        cout << score[x] << "::" << word[x] << endl; // need output to be 88:: hello there.
    }

}

OK what have I done? First of all I delete extra {. When I've seen your code for the first time I have no idea if there is do..while loop or while loop in do.while. Next I change string array to char array, just because I know how to read line to char array. When I need to read line to string I always use my own function, but if you really want to use string here is great example. Rest is quite obvious. cin.ignore() is required because new line character stays in buffer so we need to omit it.

EDIT: I've just found better way to fix your code. Everything is OK but you need to move cin.ignore() and place it just after while (score[score1] != -1);. Because wright now you are ignoring first char of every line and you need only ignore new line after user type -1. Fixed code.

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It would be good if you explained why this works but the OP's code doesn't. –  Daniel Fischer Jul 31 '12 at 20:12
    
Shouldn't it be cin.ignore(INT_MAX, '\n') to ignore all pending input? –  jahhaj Jul 31 '12 at 20:15
    
No, you just need to ignore one '\n' that is after user type -1. getline reads whole line with '\n' so there is no need to do it in loop –  janisz Jul 31 '12 at 20:27
    
Thanks it worked out, and thank you for explaining it. –  user1566796 Jul 31 '12 at 21:01
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In the first loop, you increment "score1" before the first value is assigned. That places your values in the score[] array starting at index 1. However, in the "for" loop below, you start your indexing at 0, meaning that your score/string associations will be off by one.

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No, score1 is initialised to -1, so the first index used is 0. –  Daniel Fischer Jul 31 '12 at 19:55
    
Argh, my bad, you're absolutely right. Some sample input and output would help, then. –  David W Jul 31 '12 at 19:56
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Replace

getline(cin,word[x]);
cin.ignore();

with

cin >> word[x];

and then try figuring out where you went wrong.

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This solution works as long as I don't have any spaces. If I try to input hello, there! ill get enter string: enter string: –  user1566796 Jul 31 '12 at 20:29
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