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In the following code I'm trying to check if the variable "new_shape" already exists within "shape_list". If it does not exist already, I want to add it; if it does exist, I just want to leave it. So far, I have only achieved this using flags. I'm sure there's a way to accomplish the same thing more efficiently without flags. Any suggestions? Thanks for any help you give!

    flag = 0
    for shape in shape_list:
        if new_shape == shape:
            flag = 1
            break
    if flag == 0:
        shape_list.append(new_shape)
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3 Answers 3

You can use

if new_shape not in shape_list:
    shape_list.append(new_shape)
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Wow thanks! Still learning the ropes in Python, thanks a bunch! –  whodareswins Jul 31 '12 at 20:10
1  
If order is not important you may also want to use a set instead of a list. –  Wichert Akkerman Jul 31 '12 at 20:11
1  
@whodareswins Using a set is a great idea, if possible (@Wichert is right). The existence check is (an extremely low constant) O(1), as opposed to a list, where the existence check is O(N). –  Hank Gay Jul 31 '12 at 20:21
    
Thanks! I previously thought only dicts had a O(1) existence check. –  whodareswins Jul 31 '12 at 20:24
    
Even if you need order, you can still maintain a set() as well as a list and use it for uniqueness checking. –  Nick Bastin Jul 31 '12 at 21:20

And for an answer that preserves the original flow (although is usually less efficient than the other answer):

for shape in shape_list:
    if new_shape == shape:
        break
else:
    shape_list.append(new_shape)
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I didn't know you can change indentation like you did to change flow. Thanks! –  whodareswins Jul 31 '12 at 20:14
    
@whodareswins: It's not "changing flow" per se. In Python, if, for, while, and try all support an else clause; for the loops, it executes if the loop is not broken out of. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jul 31 '12 at 20:16
    
Very useful. Is this uniquely "pythonic" or also in other languages too? –  whodareswins Jul 31 '12 at 20:20
    
@whodareswins: I haven't seen it in any other languages I've come across, but that only means that it's rare, not necessarily unique. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jul 31 '12 at 20:28

If order is not import, you might be able to use a set (documentation).

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