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In the code below I am trying to avoid the last three lines which allocate memory for the instances of class. Any suggestions on how to bring the memory allocation part inside the class definition? So what I want to do is to be able to execute pInfo[0].sValue="string"; right after AClass [] pInfo = new AClass[10];

  class AClass {
     private String sName="";
     private String sValue="";
  }

    AClass [] pInfo = new AClass[10];

   // how to avoid the code below or bring them into class definition?  

    pInfo[0] = new AClass();
    pInfo[1] = new AClass();
      ... 
    pInfo[9] = new AClass();

EDIT: what I mean by efficiency is in the amount of code + code readability

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1  
Do you mean typing efficient or performance efficient? –  Yogu Jul 31 '12 at 20:20
    
It might be nicer to take advantage of constructor arguments to initialize the fields, so you can write it like: AClass[] pInfo = new AClass[] { new AClass("name-1", "value-1"), ... }; –  oldrinb Jul 31 '12 at 20:24
    
@Yogu in the amount of code + code readability –  C graphics Jul 31 '12 at 20:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted
AClass[] pInfo = {new AClass(),new AClass(), etc.};

OR

AClass[] pInfo = new AClass[10];

for(int i = 0; i < pInfo.length; i++)  
{  
    pInfo[i] = new AClass();  
}  
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There is no way to avoid that, you will need to explicitly assign a value to each element of your array.

JLS §10.3 states that arrays provide initial values for their elements when they are created.

JLS §4.12.5 states that the initial value for reference types is null.

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You can try something like this:

class AClass {
     public String sName="";
     public String sValue="";
}

class AClassArray {
     public AClass[] pInfo;

     public AClassArray() {
        pInfo = new AClass[10];
        for(int i = 0; i < pInfo.length; i++)  
           pInfo[i] = new AClass();  
     }
}

Use:

AClassArray aClassArray = new AclassArray();
aClassArray.pInfo[i].sXXXX;
share|improve this answer
    
that results in a null pointer when he invokes pInfo[0].foo –  Woot4Moo Jul 31 '12 at 20:20
    
@Woot4Moo: Hit submit too soon –  Chris Dargis Jul 31 '12 at 20:22
    
This works, but isn't very extensible. You might as well use a Vector or List rather than reinventing the wheel. –  Code-Apprentice Jul 31 '12 at 20:22
    
@DougRamsey ah yeah that fixes it removing my down vote –  Woot4Moo Jul 31 '12 at 20:25
1  
@DougRamsey That may be...I'm not up on all the language changes since Java 5 ;-( –  Code-Apprentice Jul 31 '12 at 20:46
class AClass {
   private String sName="";
   private String sValue="";

   public static final AClass[] getArrayOfObjs(int size){
    if(size <= 0)
       return null; //You can also create your custom exception to be thrown here
    AClass[] array = new AClass[size];

    for(int i = 0; i < size; i++)  
    {  
       array[i] = new AClass();  
    }  
    return array;
  }
}

Then instantiate as

AClass [] pInfo = AClass.getArrayOfObjs(10);
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2  
if size < 0, this object can be exploited because it will throw an exception and is not final. –  Woot4Moo Jul 31 '12 at 20:24
    
@Woot4Moo thanks for pointing out –  Nitin Chhajer Jul 31 '12 at 20:27

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