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class TreeNode
{
    public string Value { get; set;}
    public Collection<TreeNode> Nodes { get; set;}


    public TreeNode()
    {
        Nodes = new Collection<TreeNode>();
    }
}

1) How would you write the recursive lambda expression to return the TreeNode with a particular value (or null if not found) assuming the values are unique? Of course #1 can be answered using #2, but I imagine there might be a more efficient way if you know there are no duplicates.

2) Assuming values are not unique and now returning a List of matches instead?

share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Edit: Corrected the code, I did in fact compile and test both pieces of code, but I must've pasted in versions before I fixed them in VS. Sorry about that.

I've added a Subversion repository with the code, including unit tests, to ensure it now works as expected, is here, log in with username and password both as 'guest', without the quotes.


Like this:

1: Find first

Func<TreeNode, String, TreeNode> findNode = null; // satisfy recursion re-use
findNode = (n, value) =>
{
    if (n == null) return n;
    if (n.Value == value) return n;
    foreach (var subNode in n.Nodes)
    {
        TreeNode foundNode = findNode(subNode, value);
        if (foundNode != null) return foundNode;
    }
    return null;
};

Note that the trap here is that for a lambda or a delegate to be recursive, you need to declare the variable first, with a known value, before you assign the actual delegate to it. Otherwise the compiler will complain that you're using a variable before it has been given a value.

2: Find all

Func<TreeNode, String, List<TreeNode>> findNodes = null;
findNodes = (n, value) =>
{
    var result = new List<TreeNode>();
    if (n == null) return result;
    if (n.Value == value) result.Add(n);
    foreach (var subNode in n.Nodes)
    {
        result.AddRange(findNodes(subNode, value));
    }
    return result;
};

The trick is here to just gather up the nodes on each level, and aggregate upwards.

share|improve this answer
    
Did you compile this? "Delegate 'Func' does not take '1' arguments". Your call to findNodes is passing in just 1 arg! – Abhijeet Patel Jul 24 '09 at 6:34
    
I compiled the first :P – Lasse V. Karlsen Jul 24 '09 at 6:40
    
First one change it to: TreeNode foundNode = findNode(subNode, value); – ss2k Jul 24 '09 at 7:10

How about this..

public class Node<T> where T:IComparable
{
    public T Value { get; set; }

    public IList<Node<T>> Children { get; set; }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return Value.ToString();
    }

    public static Func<T, Node<T>, Node<T>> GetFindFirstFunc()
    {
        Func<T, Node<T>,Node<T>> func = null;
        func = (value,currentNode) =>
            {
                if (currentNode.Value.CompareTo(value) == 0)
                {
                    return currentNode;
                }
                if (currentNode.Children != null)
                {
                    foreach (var child in currentNode.Children)
                    {                            
                        var result = func(value, child);
                        if (result != null)
                        {
                            //found the first match, pass that out as the return value as the call stack unwinds
                            return result;
                        }
                    }
                }
                return null;
            };
        return func;
    }

    public static Func<T, Node<T>, IEnumerable<Node<T>>> GetFindAllFunc()
    {
        Func<T, Node<T>, IEnumerable<Node<T>>> func = null;
        List<Node<T>> matches = new List<Node<T>>();
        func = (value, currentNode) =>
        {
            //capture the matches  List<Node<T>> in a closure so that we don't re-create it recursively every time.
            if (currentNode.Value.CompareTo(value) == 0)
            {
                matches.Add(currentNode);
            }
            if (currentNode.Children != null)
            {
                //process all nodes
                foreach (var child in currentNode.Children)
                {
                    func(value, child);
                }
            }
            return matches;
        };
        return func;
    }       
}

Here is the calling code:

static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Node<int> rootNode = new Node<int>
        {
            Value = 1,
            Children = new List<Node<int>>
             {
                 new Node<int>
                 {  Value = 2,
                                 Children = new List<Node<int>>
                                 {
                                     new Node<int>{ Value = 7},
                                     new Node<int>{ Value = 4}                                                            
                                 }
                 },
                 new Node<int>
                 {  Value = 5,
                                 Children = new List<Node<int>>
                                 {
                                     new Node<int>{ Value = 6},
                                     new Node<int>{ Value = 7}                                                            
                                 }
                 }
             }
        };


        Func<int, Node<int>, Node<int>> findFirst = Node<int>.GetFindFirstFunc();
        var firstValue = findFirst(7, rootNode);           



        Func<int, Node<int>, IEnumerable<Node<int>>> findAll = Node<int>.GetFindAllFunc();
        var allvalues = findAll(7, rootNode);           
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Hard Coded ???? :O :O – Sangram Apr 15 '11 at 9:23
1  
What do you mean hard coded? – Abhijeet Patel Apr 28 '11 at 5:08

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