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I have two divs, one nested inside of the other. The parent element has a defined width/height. How can I show the child div above the parent (outside of it) using only CSS?

EDIT: Sorry, maybe I should clarify that I mean "above" as along the z axis. And yes, I already tried z-index. My problem is that when the child element is larger than the parent, it results in a "frame" or "window" effect, cutting off part of the div.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Set overflow: visible; on the parent div.

#parent {
    overflow: visible;
}

Changed to reflect asker's update.

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If you're sure you need to do this, then try putting

margin-top: -100px; on the child element or however many px is needed to make it appear above.

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You could use the position definition to position it either relatively or absolutely on the page. IE:

To show it directly above you would replace 100px in this statement with the size of the child box.

.child{
    position: relative;
    top: -100px;
}
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Do it this way:

.child { 
position: absolute; 
margin: -100px;
}

Using position: absolute will get rid of the empty space left by the child when it gets shifted up.

Edit - after reading your update: position:absolute still applies for this situation too. It gets the child out of the parent. Then you use the margins to position it how you want.

This way you can make the child bigger than the parent and above it.

.parent{
height: 50px;
width: 50px;
}
.child {
position: absolute;
height: 100px;
width: 100px;
margin: -75px 0 0 -75px;
}
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Similar to what Chacha said, you should give the parent a position of relative and the child a position of absolute, then give the child top: -100px.

Does the parent have overflow set to hidden? That might hinder your efforts.

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