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I'm having trouble putting a few different regex together to do what I need. Say I have the text:

This is sentence 1. This is sentence two! This is three. This is four. And pepsi middle sentence is here which is five. Here you go six? And this is seven here! Sentence eight is here. And nine is the last.

I want to pull out the sentence with 'pepsi' in it and the preceding three and the following three:

This is sentence two! This is three. This is four. And pepsi middle sentence is here which is five. Here you go six? And this is seven here! Sentence eight is here.

This can pull out the pepsi sentence:

(?i)((?=[^.\n]*\bpepsi\b)[^.\n]+\.?)

This can pull out the pepsi sentence and the following three sentences:

(?i)(?m)(?s)((((?=[^.?!\n]*\bpepsi\b)[^.\n]+[.?!]?){1})((?:\\s[a-z]\\.(?:[a-z]\\.)?|.)+?[.?!]+){3})

But I can't figure out how to pull out the preceding three. I can pull out the first three:

(?i)(?m)(?s)((?:\\s[a-z]\\.(?:[a-z]\\.)?|.)+?[.?!]+){3}

but when I try to do the pepsi sentence and the preceding three, just can't do it...

And I'm starting to wonder if regex is even a good choice since it's possible for html to be mixed in the sentences. I think these regexs will be ok, but I'm not sure.

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1  
what language are you using? –  Mike Pennington Jul 31 '12 at 21:17
    
1) What language? 2) What if there aren't three sentences preceding or following your target words sentence? and what if something like Mr. Example appears in your text, your sentence match would catch it –  Ghost Jul 31 '12 at 21:18
2  
It might be easier to understand if you split the text in an array of sentences, search for those which include the word "pepsi" and slice the needed subarray for the found index. –  Bergi Jul 31 '12 at 21:18
    
If there aren't three pre- and post- sentences then I want to ignore the entire thing. And as far as 'Mr. Example', I know it won't be perfect, but I'm willing to work with some mistakes. –  user1485751 Jul 31 '12 at 21:37
    
aside from Mr., you have any other text like that: Mrs. vs. Dr. Jr. e.g., Ph.d, etc. "What about inside of quotes?", she said. –  John Gardner Jul 31 '12 at 23:29

1 Answer 1

This might do what you want (regexr example: http://regexr.com?31mm4)

^(?:.*?[.?!])?(((?:.*?[.?!]){3})(.*?pepsi.*?[.?!])((.*?[.?!]){3}))(.*?)$

It captures the seven sentences (three on each side of the sentence containing pepsi) into $1, the three before into $2, the target into $3 and the following three into $4

Using your sample data:

($1)Whole capture:  This is sentence two! This is three. This is four. And pepsi middle sentence is here which is five. Here you go six? And this is seven here! Sentence eight is here.
($2)Three before:  This is sentence two! This is three. This is four. 
($3)Target:  And pepsi middle sentence is here which is five. 
($4)Three after:  Here you go six? And this is seven here! Sentence eight is here. 

Of course, there's a possibly cleaner way to do it depending on what language you're using

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That's perfect! Thank you. The language is Java, and so it ends up looking like: ^(?:.*?[.?!])?(((?:.*?[.?!]){3})(.*?pepsi.*?[.?!])((.*?[.?!]){3}))(.*?)$ –  user1485751 Jul 31 '12 at 21:35
    
added (?i)(?m)(?s) to the beginning –  user1485751 Jul 31 '12 at 21:46
    
This works great but is a bit slow on big pieces of text. Any suggestions on how to improve the speed? For now I'm going to just do an initial search for the keyword and then if it exists try this extraction search. –  user1485751 Aug 5 '12 at 18:48
    
Really that's about the best way to do it. Regular expressions aren't really known for speed. There's probably a few optimization tricks lying around but i'm not familiar enough to say –  Ghost Aug 6 '12 at 19:55

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