Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a SQL query which returns only one field - an ID of type INT.

And I have to use it as integer in C# code.

Which way is faster and uses less memory?

int id;
if(Int32.TryParse(command.ExecuteScalar().ToString(), out id))
{
  // use id
}

or

int? id = (int?)command.ExecuteScalar();
if(id.HasValue)
{
  // use id.Value
}

or

int? id = command.ExecuteScalar() as int?;
if(id.HasValue)
{
  // use id.Value
}
share|improve this question
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The difference between the three performance wise is negligible. The bottleneck is moving the data from the DB to your app, not a trivial cast or method call.

I would go with:

int? id = (int?)command.ExecuteScalar();
if(id.HasValue)
{
  // use id.Value
}

It fails earlier, if one day people change the command to return a string or a date, at least it will crash and you will have a chance to fix it.

I would also just go with a simple int cast IF I always expected the command to return a single result.

Note, I usually prefer returning an out param than doing the execute scalar, execute scalar feels fragile (the convention that the first column in the first row is a return value does not sit right for me).

share|improve this answer
    
ExecuteScalar() is a huge win in vb, where you can just do a CInt() or CStr() on it. –  Joel Coehoorn Jul 23 '09 at 22:59
add comment

If you expect the command to return null, you should keep in mind that database null (DBNull) is not the same as .NET null. So, conversion of DBNull to int? would fail.

I'd suggest the following:

object result = command.ExecuteScalar();
int? id = (int?)(!Convert.IsDBNull(result) ? result : null);
share|improve this answer
1  
Keep in mind that if execute scalar returns no rows, you will get a null. You are correct that if the first row in the first column is null you could be in trouble. –  Sam Saffron Jul 23 '09 at 23:33
1  
but then again it's and ID (I at least read that as identity/key) so DBNull is not an issue –  Rune FS Jul 24 '09 at 6:07
    
@Sam Saffron, agreed on empty rowset. @Rune FS, we don't know the underlying logic here. I wouldn't assume whether a query might return null or not, based only on a variable name. –  VladV Jul 24 '09 at 6:19
    
@VladV agreed you should second guess on variable names but I was referring to the fact that it's an ID being returned (says so in the question) and since ID is short of identity and identity in (MS)DB teminology are unique non null values the question is either ambigious or the query will not return DBNulls :) –  Rune FS Jul 25 '09 at 18:56
add comment

If none of the above works (especially for users who are battling with MySQL) why don't you try the following?

int id = Convert.ToInt32(cmd.ExecuteScalar().ToString());
share|improve this answer
add comment

The latter. Convert.ToInt32() is also an option.

share|improve this answer
1  
The first method is from Satan for many reasons. It's slower AND less readable. Yuck. –  Dave Markle Jul 23 '09 at 22:55
    
Convert.ToInt32() worked for me whereas a cast would not, with command.ExecuteScalar(); –  JYelton Apr 21 '10 at 22:13
add comment

Use id.HasValue for maximum Nullable Type cool-factor!

share|improve this answer
add comment

int Result = int.Parse(Command.ExecuteScalar().ToString());

will work in C#

share|improve this answer
1  
It's a bad approach first dump to string then to parse when object it's already an int, it just requires to be casted. –  abatishchev Sep 4 '12 at 18:27
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.