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I'm not exactly sure how to pose this question so I'll start with some example code:

//header file
class A
{
public:
    A();
private:
    int x;
    std::string arr[x];
}

//cpp file

class A
{
public:
    A()
    {
     /*code to get the value of x from a cmd call*/
    }
}

Is this code valid? More specifically, can I have my string array in my header file be of size x, even though x is not specifically given a value until an A object has been created?

If this doesn't work, is my only other option to use a dynamically allocated array?

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Did you try to compile it? –  Code-Apprentice Jul 31 '12 at 23:11

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The code is not valid. You should use a vector instead.

class A
{
public:
    A();
private:
    int x;
    std::vector<std::string> arr;
};

A::A () : x(command_gets_x()), arr(x) {}

Since arr is being initialized by the value of x, the constructor only works when x precedes arr in A (as it is in your definition). However, if the only purpose of x is to track the size of the array, it is not necessary, since a vector has the size() method.

class A
{
public:
    A() : arr(command_gets_x()) {}
    int x () const { return arr.size(); }
    //...
private:
    std::vector<std::string> arr;
};
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3  
Perhaps a note that this only works when x is declared before arr in the class? Or that we don't need x when we have arr.size(). –  Bo Persson Jul 31 '12 at 23:16
    
@BoPersson: Good point, edit made. Thanks and regards –  jxh Jul 31 '12 at 23:19
    
Sorry, I suppose this is another question all together, but if I was to make this vector a 2-D array with a predetermined width of 6, would the proper initialization be: std::vector<vector<std::string>> arr(command_get_x(),vector<int>(6,0)); –  user1553248 Jul 31 '12 at 23:51
2  
@user1553248: std::vector<std::vector<std::string> > arr(command_get_x(),std::vector<std::string>(6)); –  jxh Jul 31 '12 at 23:57
    
@user1553248: For bidimensional arrays, I would suggest that you write an adapter class that internally stores a single std::vector<> and provide accessors that map the 2 coordinates into that linear space. The advantages are multiple, from the fact that it is easier to avoid mistakenly creating jagged arrays, to lesser allocations (better memory footprint, better locality)... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 1 '12 at 0:37

It's not valid. Array sizes must be constant expressions. Yes, you'll have to use dynamic allocation, though not necessarily directly. You can just use std::vector.

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No, that's not possible, for one C++ doesn't have variable length arrays, and further, the array size must be a compile time constant.

You can in the constructor allocate an array with new, or, better use a std::vector.

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No, you can't initialize arrays with non-const expressions. This will work, and is close to your original intent:

class A
{
   ...
   const int x = 3;
   std::string arr[x];
};

And in the .cpp file:

int A::x;
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I found that on my mac, in x-code I could do the following

int x = foo() // get some value for x at runtime
int array[ x ];

but that is seriously uncool!! I just read yesterday that some compilers allow dynamic allocation on the stack, but I would recommend that you stay well clear of that.

If the value of x is not known until runtime, then you cannot allocate an array of size x until runtime. Think about what the compiler does: can an array of size x be allocated if we don't know how big x is? The only remaining option is to allocate at run-time (aka dynamically allocate).

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That seems pretty crazy. Is it compliant with the standard? –  Matt Phillips Aug 1 '12 at 0:02

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