Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have recently moved to a project where I am encountering a lot of code of this nature - (This is using the jdbc postgres driver)

try {
    Connection conn = pool.getAConnection(); //home-grown conn pool 
    PreparedStatement ps = ..;
    ResultSet rs = ..;
    rs = ps.executeQuery();
    ...
 } catch (SQLException se) {
    conn.close(); 
} finally {
    if (stmt != null) stmt.close();
    if (rs != null) rs.close();
}

Apparently this code has been in production for a while, without causing issues.

What I find hard to understand is, in the exception flow, the connection gets closed or returned to the pool first; and then the statement and resultset are attempted to be closed. Does it make sense to execute this after the parent connection object is closed ?

Because of the way the code is structured, connection release has to be done in the exception block. That cannot be changed. That being said, is it okay to leave the stmt.close() and rs.close() in finally after the connection has been released to the pool ?

To clarify further, if my understanding is correct (i.e., statement and resultset must be closed before connection close and not after), I need to repeat some code between the catch and finally. The revised code now looks as below. Can this be simplified ?

try {
...
} catch(Exception ex){
      if (rs != null) {
         close(rs); rs = null; // close() method impl just calls rs.close() in try-catch block
      }
      if (ps != null) {
         close(ps); ps = null;
      }
      processException( ex, con); // This method logs and then either closes the connection or releases to pool, depending on some conditions. 
      con = null;
  } finally {
      if (rs != null) {
          close(rs); 
      }
      if (ps != null) {
          close(ps); 
      }             
      if (null != con) {
          close(con);
      }
  }

Just for perspective, this code is all over - at least a 100 or so methods ! I would like to simplify this further if possible. Appreciate your feedback.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

It makes perfect sense for connections to be released in the finally block. And so does closing your Statement and ResultSet in your finally block.

The reasoning is simple: You're making sure that your Statement and ResultSet gets closed, in both successful execution and exception scenario. The same goes for connection. I would've done something like this in the finally block

try{

}catch(Exception exe){

}finally{
    if (stmt != null) stmt.close();
    if (rs != null) rs.close();

    //release connection to connection pool

}

Also, I believe that when a Statement is closed, its current ResultSet is also closed. So in case rs is associated with stmt, then I believe it would be closed when you execute stmt.close()

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, for your reply. Agree, I would always close the statement and resultset in finally. The issue that I was trying to address here (maybe I didn't state clearly) was - in the code above, the connection is being closed in the catch clause, followed by statement and resultset in finally - the order does not seem logical. Is it okay to leave it that way ? There haven't been any issues running this code, but I am not convinced that it won't in future. There are many many instances of these in the codebase, which is why I am hesitant to change it all over unless the time spent is justified. –  seattledev Aug 1 '12 at 17:04
1  
In the 1st part of your posted code, you're closing the connection only when an exception occurs. It would better serve to release the connection once you're done with your work, irrespective of whether an exception occurs or not. Best place to achieve this would be the finally block. Coming to your 2nd piece of code, why write the same piece of code for closing your resultset and preparedstatement in both catch and finally block. It's redundant anyways. just have it as part of your finally logic –  Sujay Aug 2 '12 at 3:17
    
That's right, but that's a limitation in the legacy code that I have to work with - the close/release connection has to stay in the catch clause. All I am trying to do is release resources. Since the connection is released in catch clause, I am trying to close and release the statement and resultset before the connection closes. Its messy, but I am not sure if doing it in finally after the connection has been closed is the right thing to do. –  seattledev Aug 2 '12 at 22:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.