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So I've recently been trying out D, as many programmers I know are recommending I learn it over C++.

I'm using the DMD Compiler v2.057, and this is my code:

while(cliLoopC)
{
    write("?> ");
    string iPt_ = std.string.tolower(readln());
    switch (iPt_)
    {
        default: writeln(E_URECCOM); break;
        case "test":
            writeln("Hello!");
            break;
    }
}

The program is that, whenever I type in test, so it should go to the case instead of the default, it just prints the contents of E_URECCOM (which is a constant char[] that contains UNRECOGNISED COMMAND\n).

I don't see what's happening to make it do this. Any ideas?

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2  
Switch statements always enter the first possible match and then continue through other case labels until they find a break or hit the end. That's why the default should go on the end. –  RedX Aug 1 '12 at 0:19
1  
@RedX Just tested and that's not true with default (at least in the case of DMD). It is true with regular case blocks though (also tested). Default can go anywhere but it's convention (and for good reason, in my opinion) to stick it at the bottom. –  eco Aug 1 '12 at 0:31
    
This DOES look silly though. There's no way it should be like this... it's pretty misleading to see default at the top anyway. –  Mehrdad Aug 1 '12 at 0:51
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Edit: Adam D. Ruppe's answer is the correct answer in saying:

Yes, there's a \n at the end of readln. Try using std.string.strip(readln());

I just wanted to throw that in there since my answer still has the check

My answer: The default case is the catch all case, so it looks best (and is conventional) at the end

like this

while(cliLoopC)
{
    write("?> ");
    string iPt_ = std.string.tolower(readln());
    switch (iPt_)
    {
        case "test":
            writeln("Hello!");
            break;
        default: writeln(E_URECCOM); break;
    }
}
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2  
I'm reasonably sure that this is wrong. One of the examples in the docs even contradicts this answer: dlang.org/statement.html#SwitchStatement –  BCS Aug 1 '12 at 14:02
    
note that it doesn't have a break when used that way. in the docs they want it to be hit every time and then to continue on to other cases –  TMP Aug 1 '12 at 16:31
    
that or i could just be wrong... –  TMP Aug 1 '12 at 16:34
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Yes, there's a \n at the end of readln. Try using std.string.strip(readln());

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Well... I haven't tried out D, but maybe readln() is including the CR, LF or CR/LF at the end of the string and it should be included in the compared string?

case "test\n":

?

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