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I am creating a custom CMS and have built a login system and was wandering how vulnerable hashing the passwords this way would be compared to just using the md5 php function like this:

<?php $token = md5($salt . $password . $pepper); ?>

Most people just add a salt but adding pepper just makes sense if your going to add salt :)

Here is how I am doing it

<?php $token = hash_hmac('sha512', $salt . $password . $pepper, $key); ?>

The $key would be a value in the database that is unique to each user. The $salt and the $pepper are randomly generated strings. The $password is the password of course.

Added on 07/24/09

Thanks for all your responses. Does anyone have an examples of how they do a hash script for creating passwords to store in a database?

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And your question is? – Daniel A. White Jul 23 '09 at 23:43
1  
it is in the first paragraph ... how vulnerable hashing the passwords this way would be compared to just using the md5 php function like this: – cointilt Jul 23 '09 at 23:49

Your method is using a stronger hash.

I don't see you opening yourself to any extra vulnerabilities.

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MD5 is not suitable for any cryptographic purpose, use SHA-1 or preferable SHA-256.

http://www.mscs.dal.ca/~selinger/md5collision/

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3  
Yeah... that's probably why he's using SHA-512. – Tim Sylvester Jul 24 '09 at 2:03
    
Yeah I got turned on to the SHA-512 because of the length of the encryption – cointilt Jul 24 '09 at 15:04

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