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I have the following switch block:

    var str = 'matches[pw1]';

    switch (str)
    {
        case (str.indexOf('matches') > -1) :
            console.log('yes');
        break;

       default:
           console.log(str.indexOf('matches') ) ;
           console.log('no');
        break;
    }

What I want is, that if str contains the word 'matches', then it should run the first case block, otherwise the default block.

However when I run this, the output I get is '0', and then 'no', meaning the default block is running despite the conditions for the first case being met.

Any ideas what's wrong?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What I want is, that if str contains the word 'matches', then it should run the first case block, otherwise the default block.

You cannot do that with a switch statement. A switch statement compares the result of evaluating the switch expression (in this case str) with the values of the case labels. The case labels can be expressions (as in your example), but if they are the expressions are evaluated and then compared against the value above using ===. (That's what the ECMAScript 5.1 spec says ...)

So what your code is actually doing for that case is (roughly speaking):

  • evaluate (str.indexOf('matches') > -1) which gives you true or false
  • compare true or false with the value of str ... which fails and the case body isn't executed.

Now I think you could make your approach work as follows:

case (str.indexOf('matches') > -1 ? str : '') :
        console.log('yes');
    break;

but that stinks from a code readability perspective (IMO).

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Your case is likely testing whether (str.indexOf('matches') > -1) == str.


EDIT:

It might be valuable to understand exactly what switch and case mean. One of Javascript's ancestors, C, commonly used switch to replace blocks of code where a primitive was being compared against a list of values (often from an enumeration, or a series of literals). So instead of:

if (type == ENABLE_FRAMISTAN)
{
   enable_framistan();
}
else if (type == ENABLE_FROBSOSTICATOR)
{
   enable_frobnosticator();
}
else if (type == DISABLE_BAZTICULATOR)
{
   disable_bazticulator();
}
else
{
   assert(false);
}

you could instead write:

switch (type)
{
    case ENABLE_FRAMISTAN:      enable_framistan(); break;
    case ENABLE_FROBNOSTICATOR: enable_frobnosticator(); break;
    case DISABLE_BAZTICULATOR:  disable_bazticulator(); break;
    default: assert(false);  break;
}

...which might make it easier to digest (and or spot errors in) a large block of code which effectively mapped type values to functions being called (or some such). Your designated usage, checking to see whether a string matches any of a number of potential (exclusive with one another?) patterns, does not map as well to switch. If it were merely equality being tested, it would work well, but your condition is more sophisticated than switch was designed to express. Any way that you manage to preserve switch with your feature set will likely require less-than-obvious code.

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Oh, then how can I fix it to do what I need? –  Click Upvote Aug 1 '12 at 1:36
    
Change it to an if/else. –  Brian Cain Aug 1 '12 at 1:37
    
@Brian exactly what i said. –  Ryan Fung Aug 1 '12 at 1:38
2  
Just pass the switch statement the value of 1 (true), and then do as you have done and you will be able to maintain the switch statement method. –  Nino Aug 1 '12 at 1:40
1  
According to the spec, the comparison is done using === rather than ==. –  Stephen C Aug 1 '12 at 1:53

Why not use an if statment? try something like this:

 var str = 'matches[pw1]';



    if(str.indexOf('matches') > -1) {
        console.log('yes');
       break;
   }else{
       console.log(str.indexOf('matches') ) ;
       console.log('no');
       break;
  }

It should work since you don't have alot of cases anyways. I don't think you can do a comparing in cases.

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Actually I will be adding a lot more cases to it, this is just the start –  Click Upvote Aug 1 '12 at 1:41

You could do this:

console.log( str.indexOf( 'matches' ) > -1 ? 'yes' : 'no' );
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You should know the basic usage of switch. I think you mistakenly use Switch. Try to use it as following:

var str = 'matches[pw1]';
str = str.indexOf('matches');
switch (str)
    {
        case  -1 :
            console.log('yes');
        break;

       default:
           console.log(str.indexOf('matches') ) ;
           console.log('no');
        break;
    }

Please look at the Following URL http://www.w3schools.com/js/js_switch.asp

If the above is not suitable for your logic, use if.. else if ... http://www.w3schools.com/js/js_if_else.asp

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