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I have query in Oracle which looks like this:

  SELECT 
    t1.tid, t1.column1, t1.column2
  FROM 
    table1 t1
    JOIN 
    log_table lg ON t1.tid = lg.tid
  WHERE
    t1.insert_date > lg.date_of_insert
    AND lg.log_id = (SELECT MAX(log_for_last.log_id) FROM log_table log_for_last WHERE lg.tid = log_for_last.tid)
    AND t1.insert_date = (SELECT MAX(t1_last_date.insert_date) FROM table1 t1_last_date WHERE t1_last_date.tid = t1.tid);

But it consumes a lot of time to complete. The problem is at this line:

 AND t1.insert_date = (SELECT MAX(t1_last_date.insert_date) FROM table1 t1_last_date WHERE t1_last_date.tid = t1.tid);

t1.tid must be unique. How can I optimize this query?

EDIT:

I tried following but it gives me SQL Error: ORA-00904: "RN": invalid identifier error:

SELECT 
   t1.tid, t1.column1, t1.column2,
   ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY t1.insert_date DESC) rn
FROM 
   table1 t1
   JOIN 
   log_table lg ON t1.tid = lg.tid
WHERE
   t1.insert_date > lg.date_of_insert
   AND lg.log_id = (SELECT MAX(log_for_last.log_id) FROM log_table log_for_last WHERE lg.tid = log_for_last.tid)
   AND rn = 1

Thanks in advance

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1  
Using analytic functions is probably the way to go. But you'll need to use an inline view to filter based on rn: "Analytic functions are the last set of operations performed in a query except for the final ORDER BY clause. All joins and all WHERE, GROUP BY, and HAVING clauses are completed before the analytic functions are processed. Therefore, analytic functions can appear only in the select list or ORDER BY clause." docs.oracle.com/cd/E11882_01/server.112/e26088/… –  jonearles Aug 1 '12 at 6:23
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2 Answers

Can you identify why that line is taking so long (other than it being evaluated for each row). I'd suggest looking at the plan for the query and see where the time is going, it might be that a new index is needed to speed up performance, or that a subtle re-write might do the trick.

If you need help looking at the execution plan then I'd suggest starting at the following.

SQL*Plus FAQ - How does one trace (and explain) SQL statements from SQL*Plus?

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I can't add index because this table is at the other schema. –  Adil Mammadov Aug 1 '12 at 6:05
    
Other than looking at the plan for the query, have you considered moving this into a procedure instead and breaking out the sub-queries? –  daz-fuller Aug 1 '12 at 6:20
    
thank you for your time @daz-fuller. I solved the problem and will post it now –  Adil Mammadov Aug 1 '12 at 6:23
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up vote 3 down vote accepted

I solved my problem like:

 SELECT *
 FROM
 (
     SELECT 
        t1.tid, t1.column1, t1.column2,
        ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY t1.tid ORDER BY t1.insert_date DESC) rn
     FROM 
        table1 t1
     JOIN 
        log_table lg ON t1.tid = lg.tid
     WHERE
        t1.insert_date > lg.date_of_insert
       AND lg.log_id = (SELECT MAX(log_for_last.log_id) FROM log_table log_for_last WHERE lg.tid = log_for_last.tid)
)
WHERE rn = 1

I hope it will be helpful to someone else.

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