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I have a superclass O with a property UIView *view.

@interface O : NSObject
{
    UIView *view;
}

@property (nonatomic, weak) UIView *view;

@end

UIView sublass:

@interface myView : UIView

@property (nonatomic, weak) UIColor color;

I then have a sublass of O which has the following in its init:

view = [[myView alloc] init];
view.color = [UIColor redColor];

color is a property of myView used in some custom drawing code.

This causes the compiler to crash because UIView does not have a property color. I would be able to set the value using the setColor method, but it would be nice to be able to access the property via dot syntax.

Is there a way to do this?

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possible duplicate of Narrow type of property in subclass –  jrturton Aug 1 '12 at 6:09
    

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

edited:

in your specific case you need to declare view as myView *view instead of UIView in your .h file. then you will have access of custom color property.

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I'm using the color variable in some custom drawing code in myView, it is not the backgroundColor. –  Jeames Bone Aug 1 '12 at 5:56
    
you might be using setcolor for setting color of graphicscontext in drawrect but it is not available as a property for UIView –  samfisher Aug 1 '12 at 5:59
1  
in your specific case you need to declare view as myView *view instead of UIView in your .h file. then you will have access of custom color property. –  samfisher Aug 1 '12 at 6:01
    
I know it isn't, I have subclassed UIView in myView, which has a color property. I will add an extra code sample to the question for clarification. –  Jeames Bone Aug 1 '12 at 6:01
1  
please read my recent comment - in your specific case you need to declare view as myView *view instead of UIView in your .h file. then you will have access of custom color property. –  samfisher Aug 1 '12 at 6:03

Try this:

self.view.backgroundColor=[UIColor redColor];
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I'm using the color variable in some custom drawing code in myView, it is not the backgroundColor. –  Jeames Bone Aug 1 '12 at 5:55
    
are u declared property of color in myView class? –  V-Xtreme Aug 1 '12 at 5:58
    
yep, outside of this class I can use it fine. –  Jeames Bone Aug 1 '12 at 6:00
    
Have u declared MyView class extended from UIView? –  V-Xtreme Aug 1 '12 at 6:09

How would you be able to use setColor:? I don't see such a method for UIView. You can use backgroundColor property, and access it both with dot and method notation.

As for the dot vs. method notation, for all properties assigning to a .propertyName would be same as calling setPropertyName:. You wouldn't be able to call dot notation only if setSomething isn't a @property, just an explicitly declared method, but in Apple's framework I don't think it's possible.

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setColor is a method in myView, so it would send the message anyway without having to know the type. –  Jeames Bone Aug 1 '12 at 5:57

You could declare your O using myView:

O.h:

@class myView;

@interface O: NSObject {
    myView *view;
}
....
@end

O.m:

#import "myView.h"

....

In this case by declaring @class myView you don't need to import myView.h in O.h which is good. You just telling to compiler that there is a myView somewhere else. Now you could use your custom properties of myView instance.

The other thing if you're sure that O.view is always of type myView you could call setter like so:

[view setColor:theColor];

but I don't recommend this because if view will be an instance of some other UIView class you will get error, that there is no selector setColor.

I strongly recommend you to declare view property with proper class.

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