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I tried following in spring:

modules.xml:

<beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
       xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans
    http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans-3.0.xsd">

    <import resource="classpath:module1.xml"></import>
    <import resource="classpath:module2.xml"></import>
</beans>

module1.xml:

<beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
       xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans
    http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans-3.0.xsd">

    <bean class="org.springframework.beans.factory.config.PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer">
        <property name="location" value="classpath:prop1.properties"></property>
    </bean>


    <bean id="bean1" class="Bean1">
        <property name="prop1" value="${key}"/>
    </bean>
</beans>

module2.xml:

<beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
       xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans
    http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans-3.0.xsd">

    <bean class="org.springframework.beans.factory.config.PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer">
        <property name="location" value="classpath:prop2.properties"></property>
    </bean>

    <bean id="bean2" class="Bean2">
        <property name="prop2" value="${key}"/>
    </bean>
</beans>

Bean1.java:

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;

public class Bean1 {

    @Autowired
    public String prop1;

    public void setProp1(String val) {
        prop1 = val;
    }
}

bean2.java:

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;

public class Bean2 {
    @Autowired
    public String prop2;

    public void setProp2(String val) {
        prop2 = val;
    }
}

ModulesBean.java:

import org.springframework.beans.factory.BeanFactory;
import org.springframework.context.support.ClassPathXmlApplicationContext;

public class ModulesBean {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        ClassPathXmlApplicationContext appContext = new ClassPathXmlApplicationContext(
                new String[] {"modules.xml"});
        BeanFactory beanFactory = (BeanFactory) appContext;

        Bean1 bean1 = (Bean1) beanFactory.getBean("bean1");
        System.out.println("prop1: " + bean1.prop1);

        Bean2 bean2 = (Bean2) beanFactory.getBean("bean2");
        System.out.println("prop2: " + bean2.prop2);

    }
}

prop1.properties:

key=value1

prop2.properties:

key=value2

When I run it, the result is this:

prop1: value1
prop2: value1

However I want to have scope for bean1 to take only props from props file 1!!! As it's a module and other Bean2 to take value2!!!

Is that achievable? I find it so very basic! Thanks!!!

Important: it is important to me that I have an XML which includes the submodules! In this way I utilize springs nicely XML which there I define which beans I have as submodules (useful for other things for me as well). Also they live of course in same context! Very important for me that beans are in same context.

important: modules are written by other developers, I have no way to control which property names they use.

important: parent module must be able to run the child modules beans which means parent/child is not good here, also child modules need not be aware of parent properties because they are just modules.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Consider using Parent/Children Spring context hierarchy. For example, you can create a parent context and two children contexts, load your property files in an appropriate one. Beans which were loaded in the parent one are shared between all children contexts, but children contexts has their own scope for beans.

You can find more information on the Internet.

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but then if i let someone develop a module (like a plugin) and he uses some "key" which was by accident defined already in parent then his module will receive it right? i want the modules to be able to each define its own properties the modules creators do not communicate with each other nor to the includer, so collisions might happen and i would not want module to get properties from other modules or parent. –  Jas Aug 1 '12 at 10:16
    
also i cannot use parent/child contexts because i need my parent context to be aware of the beans in the child contexts as its using them, its going to traverse each bean in the child context (if we use child context) - going to use every bean in every module and run them one after the other. –  Jas Aug 1 '12 at 10:23

You should use different names for the two keys.

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i cannot control it i plan for the modules to be developed by other people i like it to be pluginnable and i don't want to enforce developers to use different names they are not aware of one each. –  Jas Aug 1 '12 at 9:17
    
I'm afraid I can't say if what you're looking for is supported in spring or not, however sooner or later, someone will take a look at the big picture and it will be mighty confusing if there are several properties with the same name but with different meaning. I suggest that regardless of if you manage to solve the encapsulation issue or not, you assign a prefix for each module thus making the keys globally unique. Like module1.key and module2.key. –  Buhb Aug 1 '12 at 12:45

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