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I want to extract info from the following tweet between first two pair of pipes.

"TRV_Insurance" || "Travelers customers impacted by recent TX severe weather can report damage at 800.252.4633 or online at http://t.co/NK4z2EpQ #tornado" || "en" || "Wed, 04 Apr 2012 14:27:24 +0000" || NH || South Tamworth

ie, I want only "Travelers customers impacted by recent TX severe weather can report damage at 800.252.4633 or online at http://t.co/NK4z2EpQ #tornado"

This information is between first teo pair of pipes. I want to exclude all other pipes except first two. Is it possible.

my regex

(?<=||)(.*?)(?=||)

I am not able to figure out how to include first two "||" and ignore others.

Thanks

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6 Answers

In your regex, you have not escaped the | so they will act as OR operators. The correct regex would be:

(?<=(\|\|)(.*?)(?=(\|\|))
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Something like this worked for me: ^.*?\|\|(.+?)\|\|. In regular expression language, the pipe is a special character (denotes the OR operator), so it needs to be escaped. Since you need to match the first two, adding the forward anchor (^) will instruct the regex engine to start matching at the beginning of the string.

You can then use groups to access the content in between the pipes.

I tried it in Java:

Pattern p = Pattern.compile("^.*?\\|\\|(.+?)\\|\\|");
String str = "\"TRV_Insurance\" || \"Travelers customers impacted by recent TX severe weather can report damage at 800.252.4633 or online at http://t.co/NK4z2EpQ #tornado\" || \"en\" || \"Wed, 04 Apr 2012 14:27:24 +0000\" || NH || South Tamworth";

Matcher m = p.matcher(str);
if (m.find())
{
    System.out.println(m.group(1));
}

Yields:

"Travelers customers impacted by recent TX severe weather can report damage at 800.252.4633 or online at http://t.co/NK4z2EpQ #tornado"
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I thought regex engines always started matching at the start of the string anyway... Why would they not, unless maybe if your pattern ends with an unavoidable $ anchor? –  Braiba Aug 1 '12 at 7:36
    
(+1 for simplifying things by not using lookahead/lookbehind when you can just retrieve the subpattern instead though.) –  Braiba Aug 1 '12 at 7:38
    
@Braiba: Regex engine will start matching the moment the first character of the pattern is met in the given string. Adding anchors will simply force the engine to start matching at the start of the string or end matching at the end of the string as the case may be. –  npinti Aug 1 '12 at 8:00
    
@npibti but we don't need to capture from the start of the string, just from the first double-bar, so surely the anchor is redundant here? –  Braiba Aug 1 '12 at 17:23
    
@Braiba: I am using the anchors so that I can be sure to capture the first set of pipes from the beginning of the string and that I do not get any other matches. In this case, since it is the first set, what you are saying might hold, however, if I remove the anchor, the m.find() will yield mutliple results each time it is called. –  npinti Aug 2 '12 at 5:35
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I think you are working too hard at it. Regex can be quite difficult.

As an idea, since your data seems to be reliably structured and delimited, why not just split it with that delimiter?

Here is a working example with Javascript. I imagine split functions should be similar and available in whatever programming language you are using.

http://jsfiddle.net/T8E3g/

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I cant use any other method. I have a specfic requirement –  Rohit Haritash Aug 1 '12 at 9:34
    
Yeah, I noticed you have a rather specific environment which limits your choices. Good luck and it seems like others might have some solutions. –  user1441141 Aug 13 '12 at 19:51
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use this regex:

(?<=(\|\|)|^)(.*?)(?=(\|\|)|$)

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The input tweet contain 5 pairs of pipes(||). But i need to extract data between the first two pipes only. –  Rohit Haritash Aug 1 '12 at 7:19
    
You're right about the bars needing escaping, but the ^ and $ options mean it will return all the values, not just the second one, at which point you might as well just use explode. –  Braiba Aug 1 '12 at 7:21
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perl regex are accepted in ibm aql.

if it's "extended" regex, there's no need to escape special chars like '|' but others non special chars are to be escaped. So a literal pipe is to be escaped.

a regex like this one should match:

^([^\|]+\|)*\|([^|]*)

then in the second back-reference you will have the needed string.

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What language are you using?

You can use pattern like this :

[^|]+

to match everything between ||, and then extract your string.

For example in javascript:

var string = '"TRV_Insurance" || "Travelers customers impacted by recent TX severe weather can report damage at 800.252.4633 or online at http://t.co/NK4z2EpQ #tornado" || "en" || "Wed, 04 Apr 2012 14:27:24 +0000" || NH || South Tamworth';

var array = string.match(/[^|]+/g);

array[1] is your answer ;-)

[edit]; if you can't use arrays, try:

(?<=([^|]\|\|))[^|]+

without global flag. This pattern uses positive lookbehind for the first string and ||, and then catch everything unless ||

[edit]; Just to avoid problem when input data contains "|":

(?<=([^|]\|\|)).+?(?=(\|\|))
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I cant use arrays . I am using IBM AQL . –  Rohit Haritash Aug 1 '12 at 7:20
    
So simple (?<=([^|]\|\|))[^|]+ with lookbehind and without global flag should do the trick –  Adam Wolski Aug 1 '12 at 7:30
    
If the data itself contains a vertical bar, using [^¦]+ could cause you to return the wrong data. –  Braiba Aug 1 '12 at 7:32
    
Yep you're right, so you can use instead of [^|] a dot, so your pattern now looks like this: (?<=([^|]\|\|)).+?(?=(\|\|)) –  Adam Wolski Aug 1 '12 at 7:39
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