Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it a good pattern to add a @protocol to a Model class and implement it in the Controller?

Here is the a code which I use to send message to reload UITableView when My Model data changes, is it a good approach for object c codding?:

MyModel.h

@protocol myModelDelegate
{
(void) refreshTableView:(id) sender;
}
@end

@interface MyModel
{
@property (nonatomic,strong) (NSArray *) myData;
@property (nonatomic,weak) (id) <myModelDelegate> delegate;
}
@end

MyModel.m

@implementation MyModel

@synthesize myData=_myData;

    - (NSArray*) myData {
    if(!_myData) {
    _myData= [[NSArray alloc] init];
    }

    return _myData;
    }

 - (void) setMyData: (NSArray*) myData
    {
         if (_myData != myData) {
        _myData=myData;
    [delegate refreshTableView:self];
                           }
    }

@end

myDataController.h

...
@interface MyDataController: UITableViewController <myModelDelegate>
...

myDataController.m

@interface MyDataController()
        @property (nonatomic,strong) (MyModel *) model;
@end

@implementation MyDataController

@synthesize model=_model;

-(MyModel *) model
{
if(!_model)
  {
    _model=[[MyModel alloc]init];
     model.delegate=self;
  }
return _model;
}
    ...
        - (void) refreshTableView: (id) sender
        {
          [TableView reloadData];
        }
    ...
@end
share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I don't see any problem with this design.

The only thing I would change is the signature of the delegate method into:

-(void)modelDidChange:(MyModel*)model;

This is more in line with best-practices you see around about naming of delegate methods, and also hints to a broader semantics of the method: the model will "signal' the fact that it changed; the delegate will take an action upon that (i.e., refreshing a table if it's a table; storing the model content, if it's a perstistence component, etc.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for a tip! –  user1567827 Aug 1 '12 at 7:46
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.